Results tagged ‘ Derek Jeter ’

The Mariners’ Seventeenth Straight Loss (7/26/11)

We were supposed to go to Bronx to see the Mariners on Monday, July 25, 2011.  But then we had to cancel and reschedule for Wednesday, July 27, 2011.  Finally, after a series of crazy and annoying circumstances, we ended up going to see the Mariners on Tuesday, July 26, 2011.  This, of course, if the story of that game – Kellan’s first in the Bronx
(his fourth stadium overall).

Usually, we always park in Manhattan and take the subway to either of the New York ballparks.  But at this game, we decided to drive right to the stadium and pay a small fortune (almost as much as our game tickets) to park in an official team parking garage.

As a result, it was our first time ever entering the ballpark at Gate 8 (behind CF):

While we were in line, we met some nice Washington-based Mariners fans.  Always good to meet some good guys at an opposition ballpark.  While we waited the last couple minutes for the gates to open, I noticed that right next to our line there was an employee check point:

What do they think employees are going to bring into the ballpark?

When we entered the ballpark, the batting cages were set up, the home team with the white pin-striped pajama outfits was stretching in RF, and there were no Mariners in
sight.  So we headed over to the Mariners dugout on the 3B side.

Moments after a guy who reads our blog (I’m embarrassed to say, I’m not 100% of his name anymore.  I’m pretty sure it was Jonathan…but Andrew also seems right too. Hmmm….), Colleen snapped this picture of me and the boys:

Moments later, the first two Mariners of the day popped out of the dugout and headed toward the LF foul line:

This next picture is blurry but cute.  As we watched Michael Pineda and Chris Ray head down the LF foul line…

…a few more Mariners joined them on the field.

We followed the Mariners a little bit down the line, but stayed behind the big protective nets that they put up during batting practice.  There were two Mariners pitchers playing catch right in front of us (well, way down there in front of us…we were trapped behind the Legends Suite seats), but I had no clue at all who the closer of the two Mariners was.  He was obviously a pitcher, but he did not look familiar at all from the distance.

Just then, the same two Mariners fans who we chatted with in line wandered by and took a family photo of us:

I asked the guy if he had any clue who the Mariners pitcher down below us on the foul line was.  He guessed it was Josh Lueke.

Here is a panorama that I took a bit later, but it shows the scene:

We were hanging out in the empty aisle all the way to the right of that panorama.  Lueke was standing on the foul line between the second and third protective netting poles.
We were just chilling and passing time in the shade…

…and then Lueke and his partner finished throwing and Lueke (holding the baseball) started to turn to walk away.  I called out, “Hey, Josh!”  He turned around (hey, the
Mariners fan was right, it was Lueke!) and I flashed my glove at him.  He reared back and lobbed a high ball over the protective netting.  With Kellan strapped to my chest…

…it was anything but a routine catch.  I had to reach up and back as far as I could and I just barely got enough glove on the ball to reel it in.  But I got it.  The catch garnered some cheers by nearby fans.

Thanks, Josh!

I knew that the ushers would check tickets soon and start asking people to head to their own seating areas.  So I asked Colleen if it was okay for her to keep the boys so I could run out to LF for a few minutes.  She agreed.  But there was absolutely no action out there.  I wasn’t there long, but in that time not a single homerun was hit into the LF seats.
Consequently, the only thing I got out there was this picture of my cute little family chilling in the seats in foul territory:

Nothing was going on out there, so I headed back to my peeps in foul territory.  We watched the Mariners pitchers finish their throwing routines:

The timing of BP seemed totally wrong.  The ushers still had not checked tickets when the home team cleared the field.  But before the Mariners batters started warming up, the grounds crew removed the batting cages.  WHAT!?  We got cheated out of Mariners BP!  No fun.

So, we decided to take a circuitous walk in the concourses in search of food.  We ended up at a SRO counter in the LF corner on the second deck with nachos, hot dogs, and garlic knots.  After chowing down, I decided to take Colleen to “Bronx Central Station” a/k/a the least baseball-stadiumesque concourse in all of Major League Baseball.

But on the way, we stopped off to take this picture that fairly well illustrates our feelings about the team that calls this ballpark home:

I suggested the thumbs down, but the priceless expression on his face is all Tim’s doing.

And then we continued on our journey.  At the top of the stairs down to the aforementioned train-station-looking outer concourse, I got this picture of Tim and Colleen:

When we reached the far end of the station, we posed for another picture and Kellan showed us his true feelings about this *magnificent* ballpark:

*Yawn*

Two seconds after that picture, we ducked into the nearby team store for some much needed air conditioning.  Ah, that felt good.  But it was almost game time, so we had to
re-enter the heat and humidity and make our way to our seats in LCF.  We had planned to get ice cream on our way, but we cut it too close and we would have missed the Mariners at bats in the top of the first, so we headed right to our seats.

We arrived just as someone-or-other sang the National Anthem:

This was our view from section 239, row 4, seats 1-4 (actually, it was my view from seat 1):

Note the police officer stationed at the bottom of the aisle just in front of us.  There is an armed police officer in every section in the bleachers.  You know, you gotta keep the people in the cheap seats in line, we can’t be trusted to police ourselves.

As he always does, Ichiro led off for the Mariners, and he was facing the perennially dominant C.C. Sabbathia:

Unfortunately, Sabbathia (who is almost always on his game) was extra on his game tonight.  It wasn’t going to be pretty.

By the way, I think that Tim and Kellan could use Sabbathia’s game pants as a sleeping back – one boy per pant leg.  Those are some huge – seemingly flared at the thighs – pant legs.

As the bleacher creatures out in RF did the roll call, I go this picture of former-Athletic great (now mediocre) Eric Chavez acknowledging the fans:

After Sabbathia sat our Mariners down 1-2-3, we procured two twist ice cream helmets and one twist cone and headed back to our seats.  I think this might be Kellan’s first ever taste of ice cream:

He liked it.  So did Tim.

Here is something odd.  Between innings, instead of playing catch with Jason Phillips, Greg Halman played catch with the third base line ballboy:

Here’s a random photo just for kicks:

Doug Fister (sadly, now a member of the Tigers) was on the mound for the Mariners and he was solid as usual.  Through the first three innings, the score was 0-0.  When Derek Jeter led off the bottom of the fourth, I figured I ought to get a picture of him hitting, you know, since he’s in the 3,000 hit club now and all.  And he didn’t disappoint:

Boom!  Weak ground out, scored 5-3.

Unfortunately, Curtis Granderson followed Jeter with a solo homerun.  In the bottom of the fifth, the bad guys added two more runs on an RBI single by Eric Chavez and another ground out by Derek Jeter.  That put the Mariners in a 3-0 hole.  Even worse was the fact that Sabbathia was, through six innings, pitching a perfect game.  Not good.

I sent a strategic text to twitter designed specifically to jinx Sabbathia’s perfect game.  Sure, it would be amazing to witness a perfect game, but not a perfect game *against* our Mariners.  That would be terrible.

And guess what, I think the jinx text worked.  No, the Mariners didn’t start hitting, walking or reaching base on errors.  Instead, it started raining!

RAIN DELAY!

We retreated to the upper deck where there was more room to hide from the rain.  All throughout the ballpark, fans were finding shelter from the rain wherever they could:

Here is some more of the same:

And we also used the opportunity to get our Bronx NY bonus picture for the myGameBalls.com photo scavenger hunt:

Once the rain stopped and the grounds crew started pulling off the tarp, and I got this panorama:

The concourses were a packed, sticky hot mess:

We grabbed an open spot and passed the time with some snacks:

Before too long, it was time for baseball once again.  The nice thing about a good rain delay is that a lot of the fans leave and a lot of seats open up.  So, instead of going back
to row 4 of section 239, we  headed to the first row of section 238.

As we waited for the tarp to be rolled up and carted off, Kellan reclined in my arms and just chilled out:

And then I got a panorama from section 238…

…the tarp still had not moved much.

Before the game started up again, I finally got a photo of something I noticed at the beginning of the game, a new elevated bench in the bullpen:

When the top of the seventh finally rolled around, Sabbathia was right back out there ready to go for his perfect game.  Ichiro struck out for Sabbathia’s nineteenth consecutive out.  But that is as far was this sad little experiment in perfection would go.  With the raining falling again our hero for the night, Brendan Ryan stepped to the plate and laced a line drive single into LF.  Here is actually photographic evidence (albeit quite blurry) that the Mariners had a baserunner at this game:

That was a relief.  Now it was time to try to win the game.  We were only down 3-0.  The game was still in our reach.  Oh yeah, how did I forget to mention, the Mariners were trying to break a then-club record 16-game losing streak.

After the Ryan hit, the Mariner couldn’t advance him past second base and we squandered our first scoring opportunity.

Fister was still solid in the bottom of the seventh.  Then, in the top of the eighth, Sabbathia fell apart.  He walked the first three batters of the inning and was pulled from the
game.  Sadly, once David Robertson entered the game, the Mariners could only score one run in the eighth – on a Chone Figgins fielder’s choice to third base.

I was longing for a grandslam.  But it just wasn’t in the cards.  And the 3-1 score was as close as the M’s could get it.  In fact, in the bottom of the eighth, the Mariners gave that run back when Mark Teixeira solo homerun.

There was one more rain delay during the game, and we ended up spending a lot of time running up the section 237/238 stairs to high from the rain, and then running back down the stairs to watch more of the game once the rain would stop again.

While Tim worked on his water on cement art skills…

…Kellan spent a lot of time waving at the 20-something girls sitting about 2 rows and ten feet behind us.  What can I say, the ladies love
Kellan.

Big special thanks to my lovely wife, Colleen, for letting us stick it out until the bitter end in hopes that we would finally see Kellan’s first Mariners win.  Sadly, his inaugural win will have to wait for another day…hopefully at Safeco Field later this season.  For now, his lifetime Mariners record dropped to 0-4.

He fell asleep on my shoulder on the walk to the car:

After a sitting through a big traffic jam getting out of the immediate area of the ballpark, we had an easy drive home…plenty of time to sit and lament the Mariners historic
seventeenth straight loss.

Luckily, there would be no eighteenth loss.

2011 C&S Fan Stats
19/3 Games (Tim/Kellan)
17/6 Teams [Tim – Mariners, Orioles, Rangers, Brewers, Nationals, Phillies, Mets, Rays, Braves, Diamondbacks, Astros, Royals, Cubs, Angels, Indians, Reds, Giants, Tigers Yankees; Kellan – Mariners, Orioles, Angels, Mets, Indians, Yankees]
14 Ice Cream Helmet(s) (Orioles (2), Nationals, Phillies (2), Rangers (2), Mets (1), Reds (1), Tigers (1))
55 Baseballs (7 Mariners, 7 Rangers, 4 Orioles, 3 Umpires, 2 Nationals, 2 Brewers, 5 Phillies, 2 Mets, 1 Rays, 2 Braves, 2 Diamondbacks, 1 MLB Authenticator, 1 Easter Egg, 1 Glove Trick, 2 Royals, 2 Cubs, 5 Angels, 4 Indians, 1 Giants, 1 Tigers)
9/3 Stadiums [Tim – Camden Yards, Nationals Park, Citizens Bank Park, Minute Maid Park, Rangers Ballpark in Arlington, Citi Field, Great American Ball Park, Comerica Park, Yankee Stadium; Kellan – Camden Yards, Citi Field, Yankee Stadium]
13/9 Player Photos* [Tim – Felix Hernandez, Adam Moore, Garrett Olson, Chris Seddon, David Aarsdma, Michael Pineda, Miguel Olivo, Ryan Langerhans, Greg Zuan, Mark Lowe, Michael Saunders, Chad Durbin, Russell Branyan; Kellan – Luke French, Milton Bradley, Franklin Gutierrez, Justin Smoak, Matt Tuiasosopo, Ryan Langerhans, Michael Saunders, Tony Sipp, Chad Durbin]
3/1 Management Photos* [Tim – Howard Lincoln, Jack Zduriencik, Eric Wedge; Kellan – Jack Zduriencik]
5 Autograph(s) (Michael Pineda, Michael Saunders, Mark Lowe, Felipe Paulino, Aroldis Chapman)
1 Bat* (Milton Bradley)
6/2 Mascot Photos* [Tim – Mariner Moose, Teddy Roosevelt, The O’s Bird, Mr. Redlegs, Gapper, Slider; Kellan – Mariner Moose, The O’s Bird]
1/0 Divisions Closed Out** [Tim – A.L. West (Safeco Field, Oakland Coliseum, Angel Stadium & Rangers Ballpark in Arlington); Kellan – N/A]
2 Line-up Cards (Royals vs. Rangers; Indians vs. Orioles)
*includes Spring Training**divisions where we have seen each team play a home game.

Tim’s Third MLB Anniversary (9-12-2009)

“Hello, from Yankee Stadium!”

1 - magic floating tim and yankee stadium.jpg

Tim’s first MLB game of his life was on September 12, 2006.  Our Mariners beat the Blue Jays at Safeco Field.  It was wonderful.  Exactly one year later, we found ourselves at Citizens Bank Park watching the Rockies dismantle the Phillies.  It wasn’t a pre-planned game.  We’d received four (amazing) free tickets.  It was a couple innings into the game before I realized it was September 12, 2007:  the one-year anniversary of Tim’s first game.  That was all I needed.  A new tradition was born.  Now, I fully intend to attend a MLB game with Tim on September 12th every year for the rest of my life.  
 2 - 86th and C-Train.jpg

Last season, we spent Tim’s second MLB anniversary at Chase Field watching the Griffey-less Reds taken on the Diamondbacks with my mom and dad.

This season, after much internal debate, we found ourselves in New York City for our second game at the new Yankee Stadium.  The Orioles were in town. 

The big debate was whether we should go to this game or the Mets at Citizens Bank Park.  Both games were sold out (or at least sold out of reasonably priced tickets (i.e., we can’t afford the Legends Suite at Yankee Stadium)).  We opted for two single tickets (one in the bleachers and one in the upper deck) for $20 each at Yankee Stadium rather than two Standing Room tickets for $30 each (twice face value) at Citizens Bank Park.

Of course, after J.A. Happ was scratched and Jamie Moyer was named the starter in Philadelphia, I was second guessing my decision.  But thanks to a blown 9th inning save by Ryan Madson erasing Moyer’s win, I definitely made the right decision.

As you will see below, we had a GREAT time in the Bronx.  It was a very enjoyable game featuring an outstanding Yankees loss.  Yea!

A little background for the pictures that follow.  I am NOT a Yankees fan.  I’m about as NOT a Yankees fan as anyone in the world.  But, I generally take photos at games of the “stars” — certainly, if there is a *no doubt* future hall of famer playing, my M.O. is to photograph them playing.  I really haven’t done that with the Yankees in the past, because I’ve only seen them play against the Mariners or the Reds (with Griffey) and I had more important things to photograph.

But today was different.  No Mariners (unfortunately).  No Griffey (fortunately, he’d be 1000s of miles away going 3-4 for the Mariners).  And the Orioles aren’t exactly *stacked* with photo-worthy talent.

So, I was left almost forced to photograph the top Yankees.  My apologies.  Please do not mistake what follows as any endorsement of the Steinbrenner-led Yankees.

We got an early start to NYC and expected to make it to some of batting practice.  However, after experiencing terrible traffic and parking situations, we ultimately arrived late.  As we entered the stadium, Derek Jeter was stepping into the box in the bottom of the first: 

3 - jeter career hit 2723.jpg

gehrig sandlots.jpgWhen Jeter planted his foot in the picture to the left, he would watch his 2,723 hit scoot through the infield.  This guy has been in the news a lot lately.  The day before, he’d passed Lou Gehrig on the Yankees all-time hit list.  A Yankee setting a new Yankee record means nothing to me.  But I wanted Jeter to go hitless on 9/11 so we could be there for his record breaking hit.  Not because I have any fondness for Jeter, but because I’ve liked Lou Gehrig ever since I read the book “Lou Gehrig: Boy of the Sandlots” when I was in third grade.  In fact, I did a book report on that same book in 3rd, 4th and 5th grades  And, I actually read the book each time.  Anyway, Jeter eclipsed Gehrig’s mark the day before we arrived at Yankee Stadium.

While Jeter was batting.  Tim stood on the empty riser pictured below…

4 - very special riser-stay off.jpg…while I took those photos.  Within 2 minutes, an usher spotted us and came over to kick Tim off of the riser.  Its a very important riser.  So, if you go to Yankee Stadium and see it sitting there empty, don’t even think of utilizing it in any fashion.  It is not for you.

Jeter ended up stealing second.  He then got to third…hmm…somehow.  Mark Teixeira then lifted this pitch… 

5 - teixeira sac fly to CF scores jeter.jpg…to CF for a sacrifice fly scoring Jeter.  Much to my delight, that would cap the Yankee scoring until the bottom of the 9th with two outs.

And, A-Rod’s double on this swing… 

6 - a-roid 2B for career hit 2514.jpgwould be meaningless and do no harm.

After the bottom of the first concluded, we walked through Bronx Central Station (also known as the Great Hall):

7 - bronx central station.jpg

After taking the picture above on the left, I spun around 360 degrees and took the picture above on the right.  In the name of exploring the unknown, we then followed the crowd up the stairs to the second deck.

Before moving on, did you notice anything special in those Great Hall pictures?

8 - backpacks allowed.jpgHere it is:

A backpack inside Yankee Stadium!!!

It appears the Yankees have re-tooled their illogical no-backpack policy.

For the record, it was illogical because, under the no backpack policy, that lady still could have brought that big bag over her shoulder into the stadium.

Of course, I didn’t know about the change.  So I had a little string backpack, once again — like back on July 2nd.

Back to the story.

We proceeded up those stairs.  I didn’t know where they would lead.   I didn’t see any naturual light (so as to suggest a view of the field) at the top.  So I wondered it it lead to the suite level, where we would not be permitted to venture.  Luckily, it didn’t.  It just lead to the second deck.

Once we got up there.  I took Tim to the bathroom and sat him on the counter while I put on his shoes.  (He’d just been wearing socks up to this point).  While I was digging through my little string backpack bag, I experienced an extremely non-at-the-ballparkish moment.

Tim saw a bag of sun flower seeds amongst our stuff and he asked for some.  I obliged.  Then, he started spitting seeds on the ground.  Can you believe it!?  Spitting seeds on the ground in the bathroom at Yankee Stadium!   I instantly had this bad feeling like we were going to get busted.  Of course, we did not.  But I guarantee I never would have had that feeling at any other ballpark.  I think the mere fact I had that concern speaks to the feel at Yankee Stadium.

 After putting on Tim’s shoes.  We hung out in the standing room area behind the second deck seats.  This was the view:

2a - bronx 3B second deck panaramic.jpgIt was a great spot.  I really enjoyed watching the game from this vantage point.  What would have made it better would be if they installed some standing counter space behind the last row of seats.  I didn’t see any standing counter space anywhere in the stadium at this game.  Installing some would make the standing room experience a lot better.

For a few minutes, we stood right next to a cop and an usher, and we didn’t get reprimanded when Tim started doing this:

9 - flying seed.jpg

[NOTE:  there is a seed that Tim just spit out floating in mid-air just to the left of Tim’s neck].

In fact, I think that female cop actually thought it was cute watching Tim spit seeds all over the relatively clean concourse floor.

The Orioles scored 6 runs in the top of the second!  Nolan Reimold and Brian Roberts both crushed homeruns.  Roberts’s bomb was actually a grand slam.  I didn’t get any shots of either of those guys hitting.  But here is a shot of the Yankees infield with one of the 6 Orioles to make his way around the base paths that inning:

10 - infield action.jpgWe only stood by the cop and usher for a few minutes because Tim decided that we should do some racing.  Then he started running all over the place:

11 - speed racer in the concourse.jpgI ran back and forth with him 2-3 times, then I just observed as he continued racing against himself.  In the picture to the right, that black line across the concourse floor (at his elbow level) was used both as Tim’s start line and his finish line.

 Finally, an Oriole who I thought was interesting enough to photograph came to the plate:

12 - markakis grounds to jeter.jpgOn this swing, Nick Markakis grounded out to Jeter.

Between innings, Tim wanted to explore a little more.  So we headed behing home plate toward the 1B line.  There is a section of suites or some high rent club right behind home plate, so you can’t see the field back there.  Instead, there is an interesting collection of floor-to-ceiling sized pictures of a bunch of Yankees:

13 - mvp artwork.jpg

My guess is that this includes everyone who has won an MVP award as a Yankee.  For example, I looked up Babe Ruth to confirm my suspicion and noted that he did, in fact, win the MVP in 1923.  (Interestingly, Ruth did not win the MVP in 1924 when he led the league in averge (.378), runs (143), homeruns (46), walks (142), on-base percentage (.513), slugging (.739), OPS (1.252), OPS+ (220), and total bases (391).  Instead, the award went to Walter Johnson who went 23-7 with a 2.72 ERA.  Personally, I am more impressed by Ruth’s performance in 1924.).

Note:  I view the old great Yankees much differently than I view the modern Yankees.  They seem like completely different creatures to me.  So, you’ll have to excuse me that I cut off Don Mattingly and Alex Rodrigues in these pictures.  They were the last two in the line.

In case you couldn’t tell, these pictures changed as you walked passed them.

After a short walk, we ended up on the 1B side with a very similar view of the field:

13a - bronx 1B second deck panaramic.jpgThis time, Jeter fouled a pitch straight back (below to left)…

14 - jeter fouls back lines to 2B.jpg…before lining out to second in the bottom of the third (above to right).

 We’d eaten nothing but snacks since breakfast.  So, we decided it was time to consume 1,410 calories of tasty, tasty, TASTY nachos.

15 - CF nacho madness.jpgMy wife and I have long been big time nacho lovers (check out McGillin’s when in Philadelphia).  So I have been very proud of Tim for selecting nachos at the ballpark several times lately.

With some help from me, Tim obliterated those nachos.  We bought them behind 1B, but headed out to CF and ate them from atop the Mohegan Sun View Obstructor…I mean Sports Bar.  Here was our view from up there:

15a - bronx CF panaramic.jpgWhile Tim chowed down on nachos, a guy standing nearby kept commenting, “That kid is gonna eat that whole thing of nachos!!!!”  Meanwhile, I chatted with two guys (who appeared to be twin brothers) from the University of Washington (Go Dawgs) who are on a trip around the northeast.

After the U-Dubbers headed off to their seats, I heard that same guy proclaim, “Oh my gosh, that kid ate all of those jalapenos!!!”

For the record, I ate the jalapenos.

Before flying out to right to begin the bottom of the third, I snapped this picture of A-Rod swinging at and missing a pitch outside: 

16 - a swing and a miss.jpgWe were in an eating mood.  So we went straight from nachos to an ice cream helmet — chocolate with sprinkles.

I wanted to sit in actual seats for Tim to eat his ice cream.  So we found this spot in the last row of the upper deck in right field: 

17 - all good in the back row.jpgActually, it wasn’t a half bad place from which to watch the game.  Here was our view:

17a - bronx RF upper deck last row panaramic.jpgAnd here is Brian Roberts getting thrown out at first by Robinson Cano with one down in the top of the seventh: 

18 - roberts grounds to cano in 7th.jpgAnd, here is the Yankees Captain taking an ugly swing for strike three to end the seventh:

19 - and the whiff.jpgAt this point, it was still 6-1 Orioles.

We left the upper deck after Jeter’s whiff.  But before we leave it in this blog entry, let’s take a look at a few things I noticed up there.

First, below to the left, there were little spikey wires poking out of all of the steel above us.  I guess they were concered that fans would want to hang from the beams in the roof:

20 - pokers facade.jpgSecond, above to the right, the facade seems much more substantial at this version of Yankee Stadium.  To me, the facade at the last Yankee Stadium looked cheap and flimsy.  In person, I always thought it was massively unimpressive.  This facade is much better.

Third, Yankee Stadium features noticable divisions between the *classes*.  Field level tickets of any variety are ridiculously overpriced and should only be purchased by people with a lot of money to waste.  But only the ridiculously non-cost conscious buyers can or should ever purchae tickets in the first ten or so rows.  And to protect their unwise investment and egos, those ridiculously non-cost conscious get a moat to protect them from ever having to deal with the *merely rich* patrons who sit behind them in the field level, and special braclets so a *ridiculously rich* patron cannot give his or her ticket to a normal person upon exiting the Legends Suite.  Sure, they can give up their ticket stub.  But without the bracelet, the normal person doesn’t stand a chance of crossing the moat into the promised land.  Here is a little visual illustration:

21 - friendship moat.jpgOn our way out of the upper deck, a nice usher took our picture: 

22 - father-son in bronx.jpgIn case you haven’t noticed, Tim is in a “thumbs up” phase.

We left the upper deck seating because we decided to head out to the concourse behind the bleachers to play a little catch.  On the way down the stairs, we stopped so Tim could watch the 4-train go by:

23 - watching the 4 train.jpgWe took a second stop along the way so we could check out the RCF obstructed view in section 201.  How do you like it?

24 - 2-ooooooooohhh-1.jpgIf you watched this game on TV, did you see that great catch Nolan Reimold made going into the stands in foul territory down the LF line?  If you did, you’re lucky.  These people were at the game and sitting in their seats, but they missed it.

 Finally, we made our way to the narrow concourse behind the bleachers in LF.  This should be about the worst spot in all of MLB to play catch at a game.  It is way too narrow and gets way too much foot traffic.  But I was amazed on July 2nd that none of the billion guards shut us down when we played catch for a long, long time during the Mariners victory over the Yankees.

But at this game, *amazement* simply doesn’t do the situation justice.

We started playing catch and a guard came over while I was holding the ball and started to grab the ball out of my hand in super-awkwardly-odd slow motion.  Then he started grabbing my glove.  I had no clue what was going on.  Was this guy confiscating my glove and ball?  It made no sense.  Utterly confused, I questioned him:

Todd - “What’s going on here?”

Usher - “I want to play catch with your son.”

What?  That was the last thing I was expecting.  Not only was this guy condoning our playing catch in a busy and narrow concourse, he wanted in on the action!  This is not your 2008 Yankee Stadium!” 

Unfortunately…or maybe fortunately, things didn’t go as smoothly after I gave up my glove.  The usher tossed the ball to Tim…

25 - catch with usher.jpg…but it tipped off the end of his glove and made a hard left turn toward the wall behind the bleachers.

We all stood and watched in slow motion as the ball rolled directly into a hole in the wall:

26 - the ball incident.jpgAmazing!

The guy felt terrible.  The ball was several feet back in there in some digusting looking water (with a partially eaten pretzel).

Another stadium attendant came over to discuss the situation.  After a few seconds, he said, “Wait here.  I’ll go get you a new ball from downstairs.”

The usher who threw the ball also left.  He then came back with a big piece of metal (it looked like a drywall corner reinforcer) that he bent into a hook.  With it, he successfully retrieved our ball.  After he gave it back, he told us to stay put so we still get the replacement ball from the other attendant, and he thanked Tim for playing catch with him.

A few minutes later, the other attendant came back and handed us a real baseball.  He put it in my hand and said, “This is a batting practice home run from before the game.”

Sweet!  All in all, I think this catching session turned out idealy.  First, we played catch.  Second, we lost a ball making a fun memory with a stadium attendant.  Third, we got our ball back.  Fourth, we got a BP homerun despite missing all of BP.  Outstanding!

Next, we parted ways with the usher and headed through the concourse under the bleachers (below center).  We saw the entrance to the Mohegan Sun View Obstructor…oops…once again, I mean Sports Bar.  Then we headed toward the 3B line field level standing room area.  (On the right below is another random hallway that I’d never seen before.  It is behind the food court area behind 3B and, I think, it leads to the Great Hall.

27 - mohegan entrance LF concourse hall to great hall.jpgWe watched the ninth inning from behind home plate, just off to the 3B side above the very end of the dugout.

Jeter struck out again to end the game:

28 - jeter ends game.jpg.

Actually, that isn’t the final strike (but I will pretend it is).

We headed down into the seats to watch the post-game festivities — random milling about by Yankees employees, etc.  Really, I just wanted to get down there to try to get a picture with Tim.

But before getting a picture, we saw Jeremy Guthrie signing autographs by the end of the dugout.  He signed and signed and signed and signed.  He took pictures with fans.  And he signed some more.  Of course, we couldn’t go down there (even after the game its off limits for the normal fans).

But I’d heard that Guthrie was a cool guy.  So I yelled out to him, “Hey, Jeremy!”  He looked up but couldn’t find me at first.  He went back to signing.  I yelled again, “Hey, Jeremy!”  Finally, he spotted me.  I held up Tim’s newly acquired BP homerun ball.  He looked a little conflicted for a second.  You could see him thinking in his head.  “Should I?  Should I?”  Finally, after a couple seconds, he nodded “okay” to me.

He signed another ball for some kid and then he looked back up to me and raised his hands as if to say, “throw it!”  I complied.  I took a picture (below to left) of him signing our ball:

29 - jeremy guthrie autograph.jpgAbove to the right, the circle and arrow shows where Tim and I were standing when I tossed the ball down to Guthrie.

After he signed the ball, he threw it back so delicately you’d think he was in an egg toss competition.  The ball fell short.  I would have gloved it but someone below reached up and intercepted it.  But he’d seen the whole thing play out and he immediately returned it to us upon making the INT.  Guthrie looked a little embarrassed about the bad throw and gave me a “oops, sorry” gesture with his hands.

 Here is Tim’s ice cream helmet with the Guthrie autograph ball:

33 - helmet and guthrie autoball.jpgWeird autograph, huh?  It almost looks like he had trouble with the pen at the beginning of his name.

Finally, an usher took our picture before asking us to head out of the stadium:

30 - almost dugout shot.jpg

We milled about a little more before leaving, and I took this panaramic view:

30 a - bronx plate field tarp panaramic.jpg

If you click on this picture to enlarge it, you can see that Guthrie is still down there signing and posing for pictures.  Notice that the tarp is now out (it wasn’t out in the picture of me and Tim).  I think he stayed there until he signed for every single fan who possibly wanted an autograph (well, those who were in the Legends Suite at least).

Then we headed out of the stadium.

On the way to the subway, I took a picture of the old stadium, which now looks like a long forgotten mess:

30b - bronx old LF outside demolition panaramic.jpgIt appeared as if the upper deck was green.  I couldn’t tell if it was moss or what.  It is funny that this place was celebrated and made out to be the best place ever last season, but now it looks like this:

31 - digustinger old stadium.jpgAs we walked under the tracks for the 4-train on the way to the stairs down to the D-Train…

32 - bustling yankeetown street.jpgthe swarms of Yankees fans were unhappy about Burnett’s poor performance and their team’s loss, but Tim and I were happy after a great third MLB anniversary game.

We definitely made the right choice in going to NYC for a satisfying Yankees loss rather than going to South Philadelphia to see Ryan Madson blow Jamie Moyer’s win.

In related news, Tim is officially a Yankee Killer!  In three career games involving the Yankees, the Mariners have two wins and the Orioles have one win.  The Yankees are 0-3.  Excellent!

Season Fan Stats:


28 Games (plus one 5+ hour rain out with no game)
1 Ken Griffey, Jr. Homerun
(Career Homerun No. 624, August 23, 2009 in Cleveland)

12 Stadiums (Safeco Field, Camden Yards, Citizens Bank Park, Citi Field, Nationals Park, Yankee Stadium, Fenway Park, Wrigley Field, HHH Metrodome, Miller Park, U.S. Cellular, and “Jacobs” Field)
24 Teams (Mariners, A’s, Rangers, Rays, Orioles, Tigers, Twins, Indians, Red Sox, Yankees, Royals, White Sox, Phillies, Mets, Nationals, Cubs, Braves, Padres, Dodgers, Cardinals, Marlins, Pirates, Astros, and Brewers — and sort of the Giants)

23 Ice Cream Helmets (Mariners (4), Phillies (5), Mets, Nationals (3), Red Sox (3), Yankees (2), Twins, Cubs, Brewers, White Sox, and Indians (and 1 Brewers Cheese Fries Helmet))
26 Baseballs (14 Mariners, 2 Rangers, 1 Phillies, 1 Red Sox, 1 Umpire, 1 Nationals, 1 Pirates, 1 Twins, 1 Astros, 1 Royals, 1 Indians, Yankees/Orioles 1) 
MLB Closed Out (NL Closed out on 8/16/09, AL Closed out on 8/17/09) 
5 Autographs (King Felix Hernandez, Jason Phillips, Ronny Cedeno, Jeremy Guthrie, Ryan Perry) 
4 Player/G.M. Photographs (King Felix Hernandez, Jason Phillips, Jack Zduriencik, Ryan Perry) 
10 Mascot Pictures (Mariners Moose, Orioles Bird, Slider (Indians), 3 Presidents (Nats), Screech (Nats), 4 Running Sausages (Brewers) — Honorable Mention: The Green Monster statue bench)

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