Results tagged ‘ Citi Field ’

Cook Family In The Citi (6/18/2011)

With Kellan still less than a year old, most of our games this season will be just me and Tim.  Essentially, I have planned out one game at each of our “local” stadiums (i.e., northeastern United States minus Boston) for our entry family to attend.  On June 18, 2011, it was Kellan’s and Colleen’s first game at Citi Field.  And we made a weekend of it.

Lots of “firsts” for Kellan on this trip.  First NL stadium (Citi Field).  First NL team (Mets).  First Inter-league game (vs. Angels).  First trip to New York.  First hotel room (Club Quarter’s Wall Street).  First sub-river tunnel (Holland).  First subway ride (I can’t remember if it was the A, C, B, or D, but it was from 86thto Columbus Circle).  First trip to the big FAO Schwartz….

…and to Central Park (FYI, this list isn’t in chronological order).  First New York Pizza…

…(from Ray’s on 82nd & Columbus).  First elevated train (the 7 Train…Queens portion).  And first picture with a gigantic apple…

…or maybe I should say a “Big Apple.”  Yep, lots of firsts.

I thought the stadium would already be open when we arrived, but it was not.  So we got to stand in a fairly big line for about 10-15 minutes.  I snapped this picture of Tim and Colleen as we waited:

Not only was this Colleen’s first game at Citi Field, it was her first home Mets game, period.  She never joined me on any of my handful of trips to Shea Stadium.  So was it was good to finally get her out to Queens.

By the time we made it to the seats, there were already a lot of people in the stands.  But deep LCF was open.  So we headed out to the corner spot by the even “Bigger” Apple:

Kellan is a humungous baby for a Baby Bjorn, but it is still the most convenient way to get him around the ballpark.  Even then, Colleen had to lug the stroller along the way.

There were two “Mets” right in front of us…

…and another “Met” about 75 feet over toward left field.  All three of them had “OO” and their first names (Anthony, Travis and Jimmy) on their backs.  I guess they are bat and/or ball boys.  Tim was pretty confused about why there were multiple people wearing “OO,” but he promptly forgot about the confusion and rained down a loud “THANK YOU” on Travis when he
tossed us a baseball:

Colleen thinks the ball is in my glove and she should know best since she took the picture.  But, to me, it looks like I’m still watching the flight of the ball on its way up to me.  Who knows?

Right when Travis tossed us the baseball, the Angels pitchers all reported to the LF foul line for stretching and throwing.  I apologized in advance to Colleen and explained that we needed to relocate over there because I was hoping we could get a baseball from the Angels, and that it would be an Angels 50th Anniversary commemorative baseball (which is the reason I picked this particular game for Kellan’s first at Citi Field).

Us three boys grabbed a spot along the railing behind Scott Downs (among others), as Tim pointed out airplanes passing over head:

And what do you know, Downs tossed us his baseball when he finished playing catch:

Although it was not a commemorative ball, we were mighty appreciative.

Thanks, Scott!

Colleen was hanging out in some seats about 15 rows back from the field.  We lingered a few minutes after getting the baseball from Downs, and then we raced over to her:

And , upon arrival, Colleen snapped this picture of Tim’s big cheesy grin:

Of course, we are competing in the mygameballs.com photo scavenger hunt, so we needed a Citi Field *bonus* picture.  Colleen snapped two of them and I love them both.  This is the one we submitted on mygameballs.com:

I picked that one because it shows Kellan more clearly and it clearly shows that he is trying to eat the baseball like an apple.

But I also love the funny face that Tim is making in this one:

After those pictures, Colleen headed to the family restroom to change Kellan.  Tim and I headed back down to the front row while we waited for them to return.  It was extremely obnoxious down there.  We were surrounded by a group of young boys (maybe 10-13 years old…its hard to judge).  They were flat out screaming at every player who touched a baseball.  “THROW ME THAT BASEBALL!”  They also mixed in a smattering of foul and derogatory language.  You know, the kind of stuff that just *really* makes a ballplayer want to give a kid a baseball (yeah, that’s sarcasm).

While those kids were ensuring that no baseballs would be tossed into our section, the strangest thing happened.  We got a *hit* baseball!  It was so unlike us.  An unidentified Angels lefty sliced (or is it hooked) a ball right down the LF line.  I ran a full section over down a completely empty row.  I was certain the ball was going to fall 10-15 feet (and 3-5 rows) below me and I was hoping that it would hop up in my direction.  But lo-and-behold, the ball hung in the air and made it all the way to me.  I was so surprised that it hung up that I botched the play as I turned my glove over in slow-motion to make the backhanded attempt.  Luckily, it hit the pinky of my glove and fell into the seat right there.  All I had to do was bend over and pick it up.

It was our first ever hit ball in Queens.

Colleen and Kellan were literally walking down the aisle toward us when we got the hit baseball.  I picked it up, gave a kid a high five, and Tim and I went back up to where Colleen and Kellan were sitting.

We decided to skip the rest of BP and instead head out to the kids play area.

When we reached our destination, Mr. Met was out there taking photos with fans so we got a family shot with him:

Two notes:  (1) I am attempting to catch Mr. Mets’ head and (2) all of us Cooks (except Kellan) are looking at our camera while Mr. Met is looking at the Mets fan photos photographer.

A few minutes later, Tim was manning the field…

…in the whiffle ball Citi Field.  Like Jack Black and Kyle Gass, Tim has got some “Tenacious D.”

After a little hitting…

…and a little baserunning…

…it was time for dinner.  We walked almost all the way around the stadium in our quest for food.  It was took crowded in the large eating area above the Jackie Robinson Rotunda.  So we headed out to the Pepsi Porch in RF.  On the walkway out to the Pepsi Porch, I got this shot of Tim with *muffler city* in the background:

By the way, that’s just my name for it.  It is basically a big eye-sore composed of dingy car repair shops.

We decided on an all-Nathan’s Famous hot dog dinner:

A corn dog for Tim.  Spicy vegetarian dog for Colleen.  A big sloppy hot dog with mustard, onions, relish and sauerkraut for me.  And cut up hot dog bits (no condiments) for Kellan.  Tasty.

While we ate, we were serenaded with the National Anthem by Roy Hobbs’s girlfriend, Glenn Close:

Mrs. Hobbs totally botched the second to last line of the anthem.  Well, she sang all the right words, but her voice totally broke on the high note (“…land of the free-eeeeeee”).  She rolled with it, gave a big laughing smile and the old college try as she belted out that cracking “freeeeeee,” and, in the process, she really won the crowd over.  She got a huge ovation after she finished.

We sat in section 523 for almost the entire game.  When Tim, Kellan and I climbed to the top, we took this picture of Colleen that shows a fair representation of our view (although, we were obviously closer than the camera view):

Obviously, we were hoping the Mets would win because that would be better for the Mariners.  And at the end of the day, that’s what happened.

I was mighty pleased when native-British Columbian and Gonzaga University alum Jason Bay…

…came to the plate to Pearl Jam’s “Alive” off of their smash-hit debut album “10,” which was released during my freshman year of high school and was, of course, HUGE at my school.

I was quite pleased to hear Mike Pelfrey representing the Seattle Grunge era with his batting intro song:  Nirvana’s cover of the Meat Puppet’s “Lake of Fire.”

It was also nice to see that Russell Branyan…

…had found a place to fit in this season.  That guy can mash the ball!  Luckily, he did not do so at this game.

In fact, the Angels didn’t do much mashing at all at this game.  Mike Pelfrey pitched a complete game, giving up only five hits and 1 run.

The Mets had a good day at the plate.  It started in the third inning, when Jose Reyes hit a single, stole second, advanced to third on a groundout and then scored the first run of the game on a single by Carlos Beltran.

In the third, Tim and I went to grab an ice cream helmet, and Tim spontaneously busted out in an in-stadium statue pose:

When we returned to our seats, Kellan was conked out on Colleen’s lap:

The Mets got right back at it in the fourth inning.  Angel Pagan led off with a single.  He then stole second and scored on a Jason Bay single.

Meanwhile, Bay didn’t look like he was long for first base:

Within seconds of taking that last picture, Bay swiped second base.

I should mention that Dan Haren was pitching:

It wasn’t his night.

Soon after stealing second, Bay scored the third run of the game…

…on a Russell Branyan error.

Both the ice cream and the Angels deficit were keeping us happy.  Actually, Tim was focusing more on the ice cream at this point:

Here is a random picture of Citi Field and Kellan as he sits on my lap:

It should be noted that Kellan is wearing a hand-me-down Mariners t-shirt that he received (with love) from his big brother.  It should also be noted that this was Kellan’s fourth Major League Baseball game and Tim wore the exact same shirt to his fourth MLB game.

Most of our pictures from this game are random smiling Cook Boys pictures.  Here is one of them:

In our four previous games at Citi Field, we had never seen a Met hit a homerun and raise the Big Apple.  Well, Carlos Beltran finally did it for us:

High fives for Carlos:

Beltran’s blast made it 6-0 Mets (Reyes had scored on the batter before Beltran’s homerun) at the end of the fifth inning.  In the top of the sixth, the Angels got their sole run on a Mark Trumbo homerun.  And that was all the scoring in this game.

Here is one of Tim’s standard silly faces that I never tire of:

I also never tire of playing with Kellan…

…or feeding him a bottle while taking in a ballgame.  (Although Kellan will soon graduate from the bottle stage of life).

In the seventh inning, Tim asked to do some exploring.  So, we walked through the CF area where the “Shake Shack” was all lit up in Mets blue and orange:

And we spent some time behind the bullpens watching relievers warm up for both teams:

At the very end of the game, we scooted back over toward the 3B side and positioned ourselves in the concourse above the umpire’s tunnel.  With two outs in the top of the ninth (when they were still checking tickets), Vernon Wells hit a towering pop up for the final out of the game.  As the ball ascended, I scooped up Tim and we started to scurry down the stairs towards the umpires’ tunnel.  But a voice from above called us back.  An usher told us, “you can’t go down there.”  He did not realize the game was going to be over in literally 2-3 seconds.  When he
realized it, he stuck to his guns, “the game is over, you can’t go down there.”

Oh, well.  No umpire ball attempt for us at this game.

We slowly made our way out of the stadium, and we ended up sitting on some benches outside for a while so the traffic on the 7-train could die down a bit.  While we were waiting, I got this picture of Tim with Citi Field lit up at night:

We then made our way back down to Wall Street and our waiting hotel room beds.  The next morning, we trooped around the downtown area a bit before heading home.   We got Tim’s picture with the famous bull:

And we checked out lady liberty from a far:

All-in-all, it was a nice little trip to New York City and Citi Field.

2011 C&S Fan Stats
13/2 Games (Tim/Kellan)
14/4 Teams [Tim – Mariners, Orioles, Rangers, Brewers, Nationals, Phillies, Mets, Rays, Braves, Diamondbacks, Astros, Royals, Cubs and Angels; Kellan – Mariners, Orioles, Angels and Mets]
8 Ice Cream Helmet(s) (Orioles (2), Nationals, Phillies (2), Rangers (2), Mets (1))
41 Baseballs (4 Mariners, 7 Rangers, 3 Orioles, 2 Umpire, 2 Nationals, 2 Brewers, 5 Phillies, 2 Mets, 1 Rays, 2 Braves, 2 Diamondbacks, 1 MLB Authenticator, 1 Easter Egg, 1 Glove
Trick, 2 Royals, 2 Cubs, 2 Angels)
6/2 Stadiums [Tim – Camden
Yards, Nationals Park, Citizens Bank Park, Minute Maid Park, Rangers Ballpark
in Arlington, Citi Field; Kellan – Camden Yards, Citi Field]
11/7 Player Photos* [Tim – Felix Hernandez, Adam Moore, Garrett Olson, Chris Seddon, David Aarsdma, Michael Pineda, Miguel Olivo, Ryan Langerhans, Greg Zuan, Mark Lowe, Michael Saunders; Kellan – Luke French, Milton Bradley, Franklin Gutierrez, Justin Smoak, Matt Tuiasosopo, Ryan Langerhans, Michael Saunders]
3/1 Management Photos* [Tim – Howard Lincoln, Jack Zduriencik, Eric Wedge; Kellan – Jack Zduriencik]
4 Autograph(s) (Michael Pineda, Michael Saunders, Mark Lowe, Felipe Paulino)
1 Bat* (Milton Bradley)
3/2 Mascot Photos* [Tim – Mariner Moose, Teddy Roosevelt, The O’s Bird; Kellan – Mariner Moose, The O’s Bird]
1/0 Divisions Closed Out** [Tim – A.L. West (Safeco Field, Oakland Coliseum, Angel Stadium & Rangers Ballpark in Arlington); Kellan – N/A]
1 Line-up Card (Royals vs. Rangers)
*includes Spring Training**divisions where we have seen each team play a home game.

The Braves and the Metropolitans (4/24/10)

On Saturday morning, April 24, 2010, we found ourselves on the 7-train weaving our way through the roof tops of Queens, New York…

1 - watching queens.JPG…we were on our way to Citi Field…

2 - citi field 2010.jpg…and a game between the Atlanta Braves and the New York Mets.

Our travels took longer than we expected, so we missed all of the Mets BP and arrived probably half way through the Braves BP.  We headed down the 3B line toward the LF corner and grabbed a spot to watch the action.

3 - citi field apple and BP.jpgIn our third game at Citi Field, I finally remembered to take a photo of the home run apple while it was “up.”  This apple is much bigger than the old Shea Stadium apple and instead of being in a top hat it is just in a random raised opening in center field.  Its not a bad home run apple, but I favor the old Shea apple, which seemed to have more of a *kitsch* factor.

During BP, we ran into MLBloggers Joe and Alex, whom we had spent time with last October during a rain-soaked game at Citi Field.  Tim just loves hanging out with these guys.  The day after this game, he couldn’t stop telling his mom about his buddies (e.g., “Did you know Joe has two dogs?”  “Alex shared his peanuts with me!”).  Anyway, the four of us headed over to the Braves dugout toward the end of BP and one of the guys took this picture of us on the way through LF…

4 - TJCs at Citi LF.JPGHere was our view from behind the 3B dugout:

5 - citi section 121 sunny day panorama.jpgLook how happy Tim was hanging out with the guys:

6 - Tim Alex and Joe.JPGAnd we ran into Mr. Met before the game…

7 - Tim and Mr Met.JPG…we’d seen Mr. Met in the OF last season but never got Tim’s picture with him.  So it was cool to get another chance.

During BP, I noticed how the seats at the top of the LF upper deck appear to be tucked away under the out of town scoreboard…

8 - seats under scoreboard.JPG…they reminded me of some seats we visited at Rogers Centre last season.  I decided we’d have to check out those seats during the game.

Here’s a shot of Tim and Alex in deep discussion about the intricacies of peanut cracking…

9 - peanuts with alex.JPG…see the little bit of dust on the corner of the dugout, those are Tim’s peanut shells.  He was trying to crack them on the cement because his fingers weren’t strong enough to crack them on his own.

Shortly before the game, several Braves came out of the dugout to stretch, run and play catch behind third base.  Here is hot shot rookie Jason Heyward…

10 - heyward national anthem.JPG…Alex came away with that baseball in Heyward’s glove.

As the game started, we split away from Joe and Alex and headed toward the kids play area in center field.  The Mets have batting cages and a whiffle ball field in CF, but not a playset like at many stadiums.  Tim was excited to do some hitting.  But on the way out to the whiffle ball field, he asked, “Why isn’t Alex coming to watch me hit?”  It was pretty funny.  I think he remembered that last season, Alex did just that.

The first thing we noticed was that they moved the batting cages from behind the RF wall of the whiffle ball field to behind whiffle ball infield.  Before hitting, Tim worked his way across the outfield shagging balls hit by other kids:

11 - citi fielding 2010.JPGThen it was Tim’s turn at bat.  Here is a video…

Next, it was time to hit the soft toss batting cage…

12 - citi cage 2010.JPG…that bat is still way too heavy for Tim, but he had fun hitting in the cage nonetheless.

 After some hitting, we found our way up to the last row of the upper deck in deep left center field…

13 - citi section 538 last row panorama.jpg…where we watched a couple innings from behind the scoreboard while we ate some chicken nachos…

14 - citi field chicken nachos.JPG…and Tim started collecting food on his t-shirt.  A lot more would follow those stray cheese drips.  By the end of the day it was an impressive “collection.”

I was excited to see what this Jason Heyward guy was all about.  I ended up photographing all of his at-bats at this game, all from different spots in the stadium.  However, he hit the third pitch of this at-bat up the middle for a single…

15 - jason heyward single up middle.jpg….before I could clean the cheese from my fingers and get out my camera.  So, one Jason Heyward at-bat and one hit.  Not too shabby.

While Tim kept piling in the nachos (like his parents, he loves nachos!), I got this picture of David Wright…

16 - david wright grounds out in second.JPG…grounding out.  And this picture of Larry “Chipper” Jones hitting a foul ball:

17 - chipper jones foul ball in third.JPGAfter the nachos, we were on the move.  We circled the whole stadium looking for an ice cream helmet.  We must have missed them because we couldn’t find them for a long time.

I took this picture of the big open concourse area above the Jackie Robinson rotunda…

18 - citi above rotunda 2010 panorama.jpg…I took this picture because that “Big Apple Brews” in the middle of the concourse wasn’t there last season.  Its a new addition this season, one of several at Citi Field.

We finally found ice cream in CF.  It was packed and we didn’t want to find a place in the sun, we went down under “Shea Bridge” and Tim at his ice cream behind the bullpens.

19 - ice cream by the bullpens.jpgBy the way, last season, the Shea Stadium Home Run apple was stationed right where this table now sits under Shea Bridge.  You can *sorta* see the field from behind the bullpens.  But there are a couple flat screen TVs on the wall right above the bullpens so we could watch the game while Tim ate his ice cream.  We also watched the Braves relief pitchers do some stretching.

Right when we arrived behind the bullpens, Heyward came to the plate…

20 - jason heyward fouls back pitch in fourth.jpg…so we ran up the stairs and snapped this picture from Shea Bridge of Heyward fouling a pitch straight back (its right on the catcher’s right knee).  He eventually struck out in this at-bat.

After ice cream, we explored a bit more.  We found ourselves in the concourse behind 1B when Heyward came to the plate in the sixth inning.  He eventually walked…

21 - jason heyward walks in sixth.jpg….by the way, according to baseball-reference.com, Jason Heyward is 6′ 5″ and Braves first base coach Glenn Hubbard is 5′ 9″.

After watching Heyward walk, we decided to check out another new feature at Citi FIeld, the Mets Hall of Fame in the Jackie Robinson Rotunda.

Tim posed with the 1969 and 1986 World Series trophies…

22 - mets hall of fame 2.jpg….it was cool to see the 1986 trophy because it was the first World Series that I really followed as a kid.  However, I was rooting for the Red Sox who had traded during the 1986 season for two Mariners, Dave Henderson and my at-the-time favorite player, Spike Owen.

Tim also stared down legendary Mets manager, Case Stengel…

23 - mets hall of fame 1.jpg…that’s a great little statute.

Before heading back up to the field level, we snapped this picture of Tim…

24 - tim trailblazer humanitarian american.jpg…standing in Jackie Robinson’s foot steps.

Finally, we went to the 3B side concourse where we watched the rest of the game from the SRO area behind the seats in (approximately) section 124:

25 - tim lounges in citi field SRO area.jpgThe game was a pitchers dual.  In the bottom of the sixth, the Braves were winning 1-0 until Jason Bay hit this RBI double off the wall in left center field…

26 - Jason Bay RBI double in 6th.jpg…scoring Jose Reyes and tying up the game at 1-1.

In the seventh inning, Walla Walla Washington’s own (and former Mariner) Eric O’Flaherty entered the game for the Braves….

27 - Walla Walls Eric OFlaherty in 7th.jpg….he only faced one batter and probably threw over to first as many times as he threw to the plate.  Eventually, he retired his only batter of the day, Alex Cora.

In the eighth inning, with the Mets leading by a score of 3-1 (the ultimate final score), Jason Heyward almost grounded into a double play (see the ball bouncing in the dirt to the far left)…

28 - jason heyward grounds into FC in 8th.jpg…but he beat the throw to first.

In the 8th inning, neither Jose Reyes nor David Wright could add any insurance runs for the Mets:

29 - jose reyes and david wright in 8th.jpg

30 - umpire bruce dreckman.jpgWe didn’t manage to catch a ball during BP.  So we were hoping we would get a chance for an umpire ball after the final out of the game.  The home plate umpire was Bruce Dreckman.

The only problem is that the Mets ushers religiously check the tickets of all patrons entering the field level seats during the entire game.  When it got to the top of the ninth inning (with the home team winning) and they were still checking tickets, I figured it just wasn’t in the cards for this game, which was fine because we’d had a great day at the ballpark already.

But then something funny happened, with one out in the top of the ninth, Alex came walking up the stairs to the concourse.  He was looking for us and he was armed with a field level ticket for a section right by the umpires tunnel.  He flashed his ticket for the usher and we were all admitted to the seats with one out to go in the game.  We met up with Joe just a short distance from the umpires tunnel.  We had just enough time to say hi to Joe when Martin Prado (in for Chipper Jones who got hurt somehow during the game) grounded out to end the game.

Even before the ground ball reached Jose Reyes, we were standing next to the umpires tunnel.  Tim called out to “Bruce!!!” as he exited the field.  Dreckman reached out and set a nice rubbed up gamer into Tim’s left “Go, Deigo, Go!” glove-clad hand (as shown above, Tim likes to wear these gloves at games because he thinks they are like batting gloves).  However, with the thick and slick glove on his hand, his left hand wasn’t big enough to palm the ball and he dropped it back into the tunnel.  Luckily, another umpire (I think Paul Emmel) saw the whole thing unfold and he picked it up and handed it back to Tim.

Thanks, Mr. Dreckman and (probably) Mr. Emmel!  And thanks, Alex, for the assist!

Tim was exited to collect his third umpire ball in as many games this season and he celebrated by balancing it on his head while sitting on the 3B dugout:

31 - umpire ball from bruce dreckman.jpg(Check out his serious face as he balances the ball on his head).

We hung out with Joe and Alex for a few more minutes behind the dugout before getting in line for Kids Run the Bases.  Tim was excited to chat up his guys a little more.

While by the dugout, something funny happened.  A teenage guy was behind the dugout with a baseball and he asked for an autograph from every Braves player and coach who walked into the dugout.  He was getting no takers.  So, eventually, he asked a Mets stadium attendant standing at the top step of the Braves dugout for her autograph.  Finally, he had a taker.  Then, he jokingly asked every police officer, security guard or random attendant to sign his ball.  I didn’t see him get any more takers.  Eventually, he asked Joe to sign his ball.  Then, he asked Tim.  So, here you go, Tim’s first ever autograph signed for a fan at an MLB game…

32 - tim autographs baseball.jpgJoe helped him hold the ball steady and he wrote a shaky but legible “T-I-M” on the ball.  Then for good measure (at the request of the ball’s owner), he did a little scribble next to his “signture.”  Tim got a kick out of the experience.

And just like that it was time for Kids Run the Bases.  The line was massively long and it took a long time to get back into the stadium.  But as we entered though the bullpen area, we were afforded a special behind the scenes glimpse of the bullpen area:

33 - moes club and mets bullpen.jpgTo the left, that is the Moe’s Club right behind the RF wall.  There is a restaurant (at least it looked like one) behind this seating area.  To the right, that is the little room where the relief pitchers sit in the Mets bullpen.

I got a couple pictures before (right) and after (left) Tim ran the bases…

34 - citi warning track 2010.jpg…but I didn’t get any running the bases pictures because I was too busy running the bases behind Tim filming this high speed video clip of Tim:

I also enjoy it when I am allowed to “chaperone” Tim around the bases — something I have now been allowed to do at Citi Field, Rogers Centre, Miller Park and Progressive Field.

After running the Citi Field bases, we headed out to the parking lot and Tim ran the Shea Stadium bases:

35 - running shea stadium bases.jpgAlthough we attended a game in 2008 when Shea and Citi were right next to each other, I was still amazed at how close the Shea Stadium base placques were to Citi Field.

Finally, we got a picture with the Shea Stadium home run apple…

36 - shea homerun apple.jpg…and called it a day.  We hopped the 7-train back to Manhattan, picked up some pepperoni pizza and garlic knots, and drove home.   After leaving the house at 8:00 a.m. in the morning, we arrived home at about 9:00 p.m….thirteen hours well spent on another father-son baseball adventure.

2010 Fan Stats:

3 Games

6 Teams (Orioles and Blue Jays; Braves, Mets, Brewers and Nationals)

3 Ice Cream Helmets (Orioles, Mets, & Nationals)

11 Baseballs (3 Brewers, 3 Nationals, 2 Blue Jays, 3 Umpires)

3 Stadiums (Camden Yards, Nationals Park, Citi Field)

2 Player Photos (Jeff Suppan and Scott Olsen)

2 Autographs (Jeff Suppan and Scott Olsen)

2 Kids Run The Bases (Nationals Park, Citi Field)

 

Satellite Views of our 2010 Season

Over the past several months, I have slowly been planning our 2010 season.  Like in 2009, Tim and I will visit 13 MLB stadiums (with an outside, but very unlikely, chance that we’ll hit a 14th stadium).  I have many of our games planned out and tickets secured.   Other games are tentatively planned, but still uncertain.  Whatever the order and whatever the actual games end up being, we will definitely make it to each of the following stadiums (as seen via Google Earth and Bing satellite views).

Like in 2008 and 2009, we plan to begin our 2010 season at our second favorite stadium:

Oriole Park at Camden Yards

1 - Camden Yards satellite.jpg

Next, we’ll stick in the region.  Our second game of 2010 will be at:

Nationals Park

2 - Nationals Park satellite.jpg

Next, we’ll be off to the Big Apple for a game at:

Citi Field

3 - Citi Field satellite.jpg

FYI, I couldn’t find any satellite views of Queens post-Shea.  Therefore, I cut out Shea’s infield and guestimated where Citi Field’s infield now lies.  I could be totally off, but I think the Jackie Robinson Rotunda takes up a lot of space under my red arrow.

Okay, since originally posting this, I found a different type of arial view on Bing.com.  Here you go:

 

3a - Citi Field satellite.jpgNext, we’ll be sticking closer to home for a very special game at:

Citizens Bank Park

4 - Citizens Bank Park satellite.jpgNext, we enter a period of uncertainty.  We’ll probably be back at Camden Yards and Citizen Bank Park before hitting any new stadiums.  I think the next stadium we visit will be on the Third Annual Cook Grandfather-Father-Son Baseball Roadtrip of 2010.  Our first game on the roadtrip will be at:

Oakland-Alameda County Colesium

5 - Oakland-Alameda County Colesium satellite.jpgFrom Oakland, we will drive to Los Angeles for a game at the only MLB stadium in the City or County of Los Angeles:

Dodger Stadium

6 - Dodger Stadium satellite.jpgFrom L.A., we will continue down the coast for a couple games at:

Petco Park

7 - Petco Park satellite.jpgOn the way back up, we will next visit the site of my personal MLB debut:

Angel Stadium of Anaheim (Not Los Angeles)

8 - Angel Stadium of Anaheim satellite.jpgFinally, we will wrap up the roadtrip at:

AT&T Park

9 - AT&T Park satellite.jpgAfter the Roadtrip, we will again enter a period of uncertainty.  Again, I predict more games at Citizens Bank Park and/or Camden Yards before hitting any new parks.  The next new park we will visit after the roadtrip will almost certainly be:

Progressive Field

10 - Progressive Field satellite.jpgShortly after visiting Progressive Field, we will again visit the site of Tim’s Third Baseball Anniversary game:

Yankee Stadium

11 - Yankee Stadium satellite.jpgAgain, I could not find a satellite view that shows the current Yankee Stadium.  So, I cut out the infield of now demonlished 1923 version and pasted it roughly where I estimate the infield lies in the current Yankee Stadium.

Like Citi Field, since posting this entry, I have now found a different view on Bing.com that shows Yankee Stadium (2009):

 

11a - Yankee Stadium satellite.jpgOnly two stadiums to go.  While we conceivably could visit the next stadium early in the season, most likely we won’t make it to Pittsburgh until Septembe for a couple games at:

PNC Park

12 - PNC Park satellite.jpgLast, but certainly not least, we will end our season with our Mariners at our favorite ball park in all the land:

Safeco Field

13 - Safeco Field satellite.jpg

And there you have it, the stadiums that Tim and I will visit in 2010.  I had originally wanted to spend the 4th of July weekend in Detroit to see the Mariners play at Comerica Park.  But that just isn’t going to happen…and I highly doubt we will make it to Comerica at any point this season.  Maybe next year.

One comment about these satellite views.  I did not rotate any of the stadiums.  Therefore, you can see that home plate at all of these stadiums except one point to the northeast.  The sole exception is PNC Park which points to the southeast.  I thought that was an interesting part of seeing all of these satellite views.

I can’t wait to get out to there and visit some of our favorite ballparks again, and several ballparks we have never visited before.

“Play Ball!”

Stadium Frames

Here’s a random, non-game-entry post for your Wednesday night.

You might have noticed from our blog that I like to take a lot of pictures, to visit a lot of stadiums, and to make things out of wood (usually baseball bats).   Well, these three passions come together on the wall of my home office.  Last season, I made 5″ x 7″ frames to display pictures from the 9 stadiums Tim and I had visited together to that point.  (FYI, that includes Safeco Field, Camden Yards, Citizens Bank Park, Yankee Stadium (1923), Great American Ball Park, Progressive Field, PNC Park, Shea Stadium and Chase Field).

Well, last weekend, I finally updated my wall through the 2009 season (click to enlarge picture):

Stadium Frames Thru 2009.jpgIf you click on the picture, you will see that I added frames for the 9 new stadiums Tim and I visited in 2009:  Citi Field, Nationals Park, Yankees Stadium (2009), Fenway Park, Wrigley Field, H.H.H. Metrodome, Miller Park, U.S. Cellular Field, and Rogers Centre.

By the way, all of the links take you to the game entries that correspond with the framed pictures.

Also, I guess I should mention two more things:  In the 8″ x 10″ picture of Tim just left of center, Tim is standing in Rittenhouse Square in Center City Philadelphia, just before his first game at Citizens Bank Park (his second game of his life).

In the 8″ x 10″ picture just right of center, that is Ken Griffey, Jr. holding a sign that says “Hi Todd.”  My mom had him pose for that picture on his first day of Spring Training in 2008 (literally, his first day back in a Mariners uniform) and my folks gave it to me for my birthday.

Its good to finally be caught up with my frames.  However, soon the 2010 season will start and we are set to add Dodger Stadium, Angel Stadium Not of Los Angeles, Petco Park, AT&T Park and the Oakland-Alameda County Colesium.  And, I’d really like to get to Comerica Park, but right now it is a long shot for 2010.

C&S’s National League Stadium Panoramas

 

Its time to turn our panoramic attention toward the National League.

 

Scroll down to find:  Chase Field, Great American Ball Park, Wrigley Field, PNC Park, Miller Park, Citizens Bank Park, Citi Field, Shea Stadium, and Nationals Park.

 

Coming later in 2010: AT&T Park, Dodger Stadium, Petco Park and more of many of the above.

 

N.L. West

 

Chase Field – Arizona Diamondbacks

(1998-present)

 

Chase Field section 115 (left) and section 114 (right):

chase 3B field panarama.jpg

 

Coming 2009:

Dodger Stadium – Los Angeles Dodgers (1962-present)

AT&T Park – San Francisco Giants (2000-present)

Petco Park – San Diego Padres (2004-present)

 

N.L. Central

 

Wrigley Field – Chicago Cubs

(1914-present)

 

Wrigley Field section 422 (approximately):

11 - wrigley upper home panaramic.jpgWrigley Field from outside player parking lot (right field corner – North Clark Street):

36 - wrigley outside LF panaramic.jpgWrigley Field inner concourse below center field bleachers:

35 - wrigley CF concourse exit panaramic.jpgWrigley Field bleachers section 342:

34a - wrigley CF bleachers panaramic.jpgWrigley Field from main cross aisle between section 135 (front) and section 235 (behind):


32 - wrigley RF foul panaramic.jpgWrigley Field from main cross aisle between section 438 (front) and section 538 (behind):

12 - wrigley upper RF panaramic.jpgWrigley Field from main cross aisle between section 404 (front) and section 504 (behind):

13 - wrigley upper LF panaramic.jpg

Wrigley Field section section 235, Row 11, Seat 4 (obstructed view of second base):

17 - wrigley sec. 235 auto panaramic.jpgWrigley Field section 226, approximately row 20 (obstructed view of pitchers mound):

8 - wrigley sec. 226 panaramic.jpgWrigley Field from small cross aisle between section 19 (front) and section 118 (behind):

5 - wrigley plate panaramic.jpgWrigley Field section 101 and section 102 (front row):

2 - wrigley first view LF panaramic.jpg

 

Great American Ball Park – Cinncinati Reds

(2003-present)

 

Great American Ball Park section 140, row Z:

13 - GrAm RF Panarama.jpg

 

PNC Park – Pittsburgh Pirates

(2001-present)

 

PNC Park from atop the standing area spiral concourse:

13 - PNC Park LF upper HR panaramic.jpgPNC Park section 302 (approximately)

PNC Park RF upper foul panaramic.jpg

 

Miller Park – Milwaukee Brewers

(2001-present)

 

Miller Park section 422:

22 - miller home upper panaramic.jpgMiller Park section 104, row 9, seats 21-22 (aisle seats - obstructed view of outfield):

28 - miller RF HR field panaramic.jpgMiller Park section 438:

23 - miller LF foul upper panaramic.jpgMiller Park section 416:

21 - miller 1B infield upper panaramic.jpgMiller Park section 404:

19 - miller RF upper panaramic.jpgMiller Park section 202:

18 - miller RCF upper panaramic.jpgMiller Park section 236:

10 - miller LCF upper panaramic.jpgMiller Park section 120 (front row):

5 - miller home field panaramic.jpgMiller Park section 124:

4 - miller 3B field panaramic.jpg

 

N.L. East

 

Citizens Bank Park – Philadelphia Phillies

(2004-present)

 

Citizens Bank Park section 421 (left) and section 420 (right):

citz home back row.jpg.

Citizens Bank Park section 423:

14 - citz upper  3B-home tarp panaramic.jpgCitizens Bank Park SRO counter between sections 138 (left) and section 137 (right):

citz1.jpgCitizens Bank Park section 344 (standing room counter behind back row):

citz2.jpgCitizens Bank Park section 204 in day light (standing room behind back row):

citz3.jpgCitizens Bank Park section 122 (SRO counter behind back row):

citz4.jpgCitizens Bank Park section 130 (SRO behind back row):


citz5.jpgCitizens Bank Park section 107 (SRO counter behind back row):

citz6.jpgCitizens Bank Park section 140 (SRO counter behind back row):

citz LF corner SRO panoramic.jpgCitizens Bank Park section 118 (front row):

citz phils dugout.jpgCitizens Bank Park section 112 (SRO behind back row):

10 - citz rf rain delay panaramic.jpg

Citizens Bank Park scoreboard and Philadelphia from LF 300-level foul concourse: 16 - citz upper LF concourse city panaramic.jpgCitizens Bank Park section 344 at evening (standing room counter behind back row):.

18 - citz upper LF panaramic.JPGCitizens Bank Park Ashburn Alley from base of Richie Ashburn statue:

24 - citz ashburn alley panaramic.jpgCitizens Bank Park from rooftop walkway above Ashburn Alley (night):

30 - citz CF rooftop panaramic.jpgCitzens Bank Park from deep RCF rooftop deck above Ashburn Alley:

31 - citz CF rooftop panaramic2.jpgCitizens Bank Park section 1 (front row):

4 - citz 1b field panaramic.jpgCitizens Bank Park from concourse behind section 211:

200 level RF foul panoramic.jpgCitizens Bank Park panoramic view of bullpens from section 101:

9 - bullpen tiers.jpgCitizens Bank Park suite 55:

4 - citz suite view panarama.jpgCitizens Bank Park section 235, row 9:

3 - citz panarama.jpgCitizens Bank Park section 130, row 8, seat 1:

1 - 9-12-07 Phillies Panarama2.jpgCitizens Bank Park from center field rooftop deck (day light):

3 - citz CF sun deck panarama roadtrip.jpg

 

Citi Field – New York Mets

(2009-present)

 

Citi Field from Willets Point subway platform (7-Train):

citi subway platform.jpg

Citi Field section 15 in the Sterling Club seats:

37 - citi sterling club plate panarama.jpgCiti Field section 339 (concourse) view toward scoreboard and kids’ play area:

34 - citi scoreboard kids area panarama.jpgCiti Field section 339 (back row on CF aisle):

33 - citi CF 300 level panarama.jpgCiti Field – upper deck concourse (behind home plate and above Rotunda):

32 - citi upper deck plate concourse panaramic.jpgCiti Field section 514:

31 - citi plate upper panaramic.jpgCiti Field concourse behind section 404 (approximately):

30 - citi rf foul upper concourse panarama.jpgCiti Field section 501 (back row on aisle):

29 - citi RF foul upper panaramic.jpgCiti Field section 305 (back row on aisle) Pepsi Porch:

27 - citi pepsi porch 3 panaramic.jpgCiti Field section 301 (second row) Pepsi Porch:

25 - citi pepsi porch 2 panramic.jpgCiti Field walkway to Pepsi Porch:

24 - citi walk to pepsi porch panaramic.jpgCiti Field section 122:

17 - citi section 122 panarama.jpgCiti Field section 121 (front row):

8 - citi 3B dugout panarama.jpgCiti Field section 130 & section 131 (front row):

2 - citi lf foul field panarama.jpg

Citi Field section 12 (left) and section 11(right) in the Sterling Club seats:

citi section 11-12 panorama.jpgCiti Field from aisle between section 121 (left) and Sterling Club seats (right):

citi section 121 panorama.jpg

Citi Field section 526 row 9 seats 14-15:

citi3.jpgCiti Field section 127 (standing room in concourse behind back row of seats):

citi1.jpgCiti Field section 114 (standing room concourse behind back row of seats):

citi2.jpg

 

Shea Stadium – New York Mets

(1964-2008)

 

Shea Stadium upper reserve section 10, row M, seat 7:

shea upper reserve section 10 row m seat 7.jpgShea Stadium mezzanine section 19, row A, seat 7:

shea 1B middle foul day.jpg

Shea Stadium mezzanine section 19, row A, seat 7:

shea 1B middle foul night.jpgShea Stadium section 165:

shea RF corner field level.jpgShea Stadium exterior from south (walking toward 7-Train Platform on Roosevelt Ave.):

shea exterior.jpgShea Stadium section 215 (second row):

17 - shea 1B field panorama.jpg

 

Nationals Park - Washington Nationals

(2008-present)

 

Nationals Park section 316:

DC Home Plate 3d Deck Panoramic View.jpg

Nationals Park section 101 (left) and section 102 (right):

1st field view LF panoramic.jpgNationals Park section 113 (left) and section 114 (right):

DC 3B paroramic view.jpgNationals Park bridge between section 221 (left) and section 223 (right):

DC 1st Base 2d Deck Panoramic view.jpgNationals Park between section 231 (left) and section 233 (right):

DC 2d Deck RF foul panoramic view.jpgNationals Park between section 242 (left) and 243 (right):

DC 2d Deck CF panoramic view.jpgNationals Park standing room area toward center behind section 143:

DC Field Level RCF Panoramic View.jpgNationals Park open area beyond CF fence (taken from kids play area):

CF area.jpgNationals Park from middle of “Red Loft” (after game):

DC Red Porch Panoramic View.jpgNationals Park section 301 (back row):

DC 3d Deck LF Foul Panoramic View.jpgNationals Park section 134.

DC 1B Field Level Panoramic View.jpgNationals Park section 138:

7 DC RF rain delay panoramic.jpgNationals Park section 201 (rain out of Randy Johnson’s scheduled 300th win game):

17 LF rain delay panoramic.jpgNationals Park section 117 (left) and section 118 (right):

25 -nats cubs dugout panaramic.jpgNationals Park from center field side of the “Red Loft” (during game):

24 - nats red porch panaramic.jpgNationals Park section 139 (handicap accessible seating behind back row):

15 - nats rf ice cream seasts panaramic.jpgNationals Park standing room area between section 143 and the batters’ eye:

9 - nats cf field panaramic.jpgNationals Park section 134 (handicapped accessible seating behind back row):

3 - nats 1B chxfries seats panaramic.jpg

There you go.  That is every NL panoramic ballpark view I have created and posted on our blog so far.  I love doing these, so check back in the future and there will be some new panaramics mixed in with these one. 

Hello-and-Goodbye, Shea Stadium (9/7/08)

When early September 2008 rolled around, I thought to myself, “Self, Tim has never been to Shea Stadium and it is about to close.  Let’s not let that happen without getting Tim up to Queens.”

So, early in the morning on September 7, 2008, Tim and I hopped in the car and made our way up to Manhatten.  As is my standard practice, we parked on the upper west side.  We then walked with Tim on my shoulders from approximately 84th & Amsterdam to 42nd & Seventh Ave.  After a 7-train ride from Times Square station to Willets Point, we arrived at Shea Stadium.

1 - shea exterior.jpgIt was a day-night doubleheader.  We would attent only the day game.  As we made our way up to our seats in Upper Reserve section 10, Row M, the visitors’ dugout (occupied by the Phillies) welcomed us to Shea:

1a - Welcome to Shea.jpgIf there was batting practice, we didn’t make it in time for it.  As we made out way to out seats, the grounds crew was putting the final touches on the field.  We decided to head up to the last row…

2 - climbing to top of shea.jpg…to see the sights.  And I was interested to discover that we could see the Empire State Building off in the distance in Manhatten…

3 - shea empire state building.jpg…that’s it just above the bill of Tim’s hat.

And here was our view of Shea from the upper deck:

4 - shea upper reserve section 10 panorama.jpgAt least as I perceived it, Shea always got a bad rap.  Particularly, because everyone glorified Yankee Stadium (which to me was utterly unimpressive — particularly when compared to the other “old” ballparks, Wrigley Field and Fenway Park).  Anyway, I always liked Shea Stadium.  I probably attended 8 games total at Shea between 2000-2008 and I always found it to be a much more pleasant place to watch a ballgame than its neighbor in the Bronx.

Some kind Mets fan agreed to take our picture:

5 - TJCs at Shea.jpgNote how Citi Field appears to be about 2 feet away from Shea beyond the outfield fence.  I was both amazed and saddened the following April when Tim and I attended our first game at Citi Field and we discovered that Shea was already demolished and hauled away.

Soon, it was time for the game to begin.  The atmosphere in the stadium was electric.  The Phillies and Mets are pretty big rivals.  Entering the day, the Mets were leading the Phillies atop the N.L. East by two games.

The pitching was an epic battle between two “old goats” — my favorite pitcher of all-time, Jamie Moyer, and future Hall of Famer, Pedro Martinez…

6 - Moyer v. Pedro Martinez.jpg…by the way, “old goats” is Pedro’s description of himself and Moyer, not mine.

Early on, both old goats were dealing…

7 - Old Goats Dealing.jpg…my man, Moyer, would keep it up giving up only 2 hits and zero earned runs in 7 innings of work.  Pedro, however, would struggle starting in the second inning.

In the second inning, Pedro walked Jayson Werth.  Former Mariner Greg Dobbs followed with a double, Matt Stairs with a sac fly, and Carlos Ruiz hit a double.  And just like that, the Phillies led 2-0.

Two batters Pedro did manage to retire in the second were Ryan Howard and Jamie Moyer…

8 - Howard Whiffs Moyer Grounds Out.jpg…Howard looked silly flailing at several pitches and ultimately striking out.  Moyer at least put the ball in play.

It was a big snack day for Tim.  We started off with some french fries.  Then, it was time for a Shea Stadium Mets ice cream helmet:


9 - Shea Ice Cream Helmet.jpgA couple innings into the game, we decided to explore the stadium a bit.  I knew this would be Tim’s only chance to ever see Shea.  So I wanted us to see what it had to offer.

Here are a couple stadium views from inside the concourses and ramps on our way down to the field level…

10 - concourses.jpg…I think that picture to the left is pretty interesting.  It shows that Shea Stadium had two sets of ramps circling the stadium.

Moyer was still pitching a gem.

11 - Moyer continues to deal.jpgWith a win in this game, Moyer would run his record to 13-7 on the season and it was his 243rd win of his excellent career.

Since the stadium would soon be history, I wanted to document as much of it as possible.  Here is a stadium map that hung inside the concourse behind section 31 in the Loge level:

12 - loge level map.jpgI had never done much exploring at Shea before.  But I knew there were some standing room areas down each foul line.  So that’s where we headed out in RF.

13 - RF field level standing room.jpgAs you can see, the standing room area is in an inside concourse with a screen in front of it.  Back in 2003, I watched almost an entire game from the corresponding standing room area down the LF foul line.  Its a nice little spot.  Interestingly, that other game I watched from the standing room area was also part of a Sunday doubleheader and it was also a 7 inning, 2 hit, zero earned run win by Jamie Moyer.

Tim and I hung out there a little while so Tim could run around in circles.

Here is a panoramic view of Shea Stadium from the seats closest to the standing room area:

13a - shea RF corner field level.jpgNext, we started to make our way toward home plate.  On the way, I saw this interesting ketchup and mustard packet dispenser…

14 - ketchup mets mustard.jpg….which I thought was pretty interesting.  Seems like most stadiums have ketchup and mustard pumps, not little packets.  I wonder if someone bought this ketchup and mustard contraption once the Mets started trying to sell off any-and-everything from Shea Stadium.  Actually, if you want one of these, click here.

We saw that there were plenty of empty seats toward the home plate area.  This wasn’t a planned doubleheader and it wasn’t a make-up of a game from early in the season.  No.  This game was supposed to be played the night before.  In fact, we had planned to attend the game on September 6th.  Anyway, it appeared that some of the people who planned to attend the game on the 6th couldn’t make it on the 7th.  And we were the beneficiaries.

I snapped some pictures of the Phillies stellar corps of infielders on our way to our final seats of the day…

15 - phils infielders.jpg…Ryan Howard, Chase Utley and Jimmie Rollins each had one hit on the day.  But the big hitting star of the day was Greg “The Dobbers” Dobbs who was 2-4 with a 3-run 4th inning homerun off of Pedro Martinez.  He also scored 2 runs.  After the 4th inning, the Phillies led 6-0.

And here are our final seats of the day in (I believe) section 215:

16 - infield box seats.jpgAnd here is my best effort at patching together a panoramic view from these seats:

17 - shea 1B field panorama.jpgIt was a great spot to see the action up close…

18 - Pedro Feliz at bat.jpg…like this pitch to Phils third basemen, Pedro Feliz.

And it was nice to see Mets first basemen and big-time slugger, Carlos Delgado…

19 - Mets infield.jpg…who went 0-4 on the day.

Here is a shot of the Phillies dugout and the Mets logo behind home plate as Shane “The Flying Hawaiian” Victorino approaches the plate:

20 - Victorino approaches plate.jpgPedro Martinez only lasted 4 innings and left trailing 6-0.  A host of Mets relievers finished off the fifth through ninth innings without giving up any more runs.

Moyer lasted 7 innings before Scott Eyre came in and gave up the only two Mets runs in the 8th inning.  The Phillies won the game by a final score of 6-2 to move to 1-game back of the Mets.  In the nightcap, Johan Santana beat Cole Hamels and the Mets re-took a 2-game lead in the N.L. East, a lead they would build to 3.5 games a few days later and then squander to miss the playoffs completely.

This was the 14th to last game game at Shea Stadium.  It was great to add Shea to Tim’s baseball stadium resume.  We got one more picture to commemorate the day…

21 - TJCs lower Shea and cowbell man.jpg…by the way, in that picture “Cow-Bell Man” is standing behind us.  He let Tim clank his cowbell during the game.  “MORE COWBELL!”

On our way out of Shea Stadium for the final time, I took a picture of the four seating decks above the field level…

22 - 5 levels of Shea.jpgOn this sign, Mr. Met thanked the exiting crowd for coming out to Shea Stadium:

23 - goodbye from shea.jpgThe crowd made its way out of the Stadium, many of them like us never to return.

24 - Goodbye Shea.jpgThe next time we traveled to Queens, it would be to visit the new Citi Field, and many people like us would miss the simple and stripped down charm of Shea Stadium and its brightly colored seats.

Goodbye, Shea Stadium.

Fun Times in Queens (10-3-09)


For a while, I’d been wanting to go back to Citi Field for a second game.  We’d gone in April when the Stadium was just two weeks old.  I wasn’t a huge fan of it then.  It was too crowded and I felt like we couldn’t get anywhere near the field.


Well, a few weeks ago, I found a pair of $25/ticket upper deck tickets on Stub Hub for $3 each.  We couldn’t pass it up.


I was excited to see Citi Field again, not only because I knew it would be far less crowded due to the Mets poor performance but, because it would be our first game ever in the month of October.  Plus, I was hoping we’d get a ball — our first ever in Queens.


We started out early by driving to New York (or as Tim says “You Nork”) and, as the picture below shows…


1 - getting there.jpg…we headed through the Lincoln Tunnel, parked in the Upper West side, hopped on the C-Train at 81st Street, transferred to the 7-Train at 42nd, watched all of the graffiti go by in the rooftops of Queens, and arrived at Citi Field at about 11:40 a.m.

We entered the stadium through the Jackie Robinson Rotunda and headed up the escalator toward LF to see if there would be BP taking place.  After getting denied access to the field section behind the 3B dugout, we headed down the line and grabbed a spot on the railing by LF.  The Astros were hitting and this was our view: 
2 - citi lf foul field panarama.jpgThere were two Astos pitchers shagging balls down in the LF corner and Tim was watching them like a hawk:
 


3 - jose cruz samuel gervacio wilton lopez and tim.jpgIn the picture above to the left, the middle guy is Samuel Gervacio and the guy on the right is Wilton Lopez.  Lopez was having a grand old time toying with the crowd.  On every ball he caught, he faked like he was going to toss into the stands and then he’d turn around with an ear-to-ear smile and throw it in toward the bucket.  Eventually, former Astro and current Astros coach Jose Cruz (above to the far left) walked out to LF with his fungo bat.

As by strolled by, I asked him, “Hey, coach, can you fungo a ball up here for my son?”  He nodded “yes” and pointed at Tim as if to say, “Is that him?”  I nodded, “Yes.”

Meanwhile, Lopez was taunting the crowd with yet another ball.  Quitely but very authoritatively, Cruz called out to Lopez and motioned for the ball.  Lopez’s face instantly turned from playful-kid to serious-and-respectful.  He toss the ball to Cruz without hesitation.

Cruz turned around and tossed me this:


4 - 1st career ball in queens.jpgCook & Son’s first ball ever in Queens!  And our first ball with the patented Houston Astros “H” magic markered onto the sweet spot.

“Thanks, Mr. Cruz!”

Tim was a little upset that he did’t catch it himself.  He got bit by the catching bug, I guess, after meeting up with Ryan Rowland-Smith in Toronto the previous weekend.

At this point, Tim was just wearing his socks and his shoes were in my backpack.  I told him to put on his shoes so we could head out to the OF and poke around.  He wasn’t too interested in his shoes.  So, I popped him up on my shoulders and we walked to the LF seats.  On our way, I heard, “Hey, Todd!”  I looked up and it was Alex K. from “Riveravenue.”  We’d met Alex in Chicago at Tim’s 30th MLB team milestone game.  We’d exchanged some emails and knew we might run into each other at this game.

As we went over and started chatting with Alex, I heard another voice call out, “Hi Todd and Tim.”  It was Joe from “Baseballexperiences.”  I’d never met Joe before, but I’d read about him on Zack Hample’s Blog and, through Zack, on his own blog.

Joe introduced himself and said he reads our blog.  Its always cool to meet people from MLBlogs.  And these guys would turn out to be extremely cool and fun to roam around the stadium with at several points during the day.  They were absolutely great with Tim and he couldn’t get enough of them.

We started by chatting and then a picture:


5 - tim's guys.jpgJoe is on the left and Alex is holding Tim on his lap as he reclines on the back of a seat in LF.  Note that Tim is holding his shoe.  We pulled the old Billy Madison “everyone my age __________, its the coolest!” trick on Tim (we filled in the blank with “wears shoes”), and it worked like a charm.  Tim was happy to wear his shoes after seeing that Joe and Alex were also wearing shoes.

Tim then showed off his first Citi Field ball to his new “guys”:


6 - showing off jose cruz ball.jpgAfter a few minutes, one of the guys asked if Tim and I wanted to go over to the dugout.  I said we couldn’t because we had upper-deck tickets.  They both assured us it was no problem.  Joe had an extra ticket on him — maybe it was his dad’s, I’m not sure.  Anyway, we were up for checking out the restricted area so we followed Joe:


7 - to the dugout.jpgThe guy standing a couple sections in front of Joe in the green jacket asked “do you guys have tickets over here?”  Joe flashed his ticket and the guy responded, “Yep, you do, head on in, guys.”  I think he automatically assumed we all had the right tickets.  He didn’t seem too concerned about checking the rest of our tickets, but I showed our loaner ticket anyway.

And that easily, we were behind the dugout where there was hardly anyone in the stands.  This was our view:


8 - citi 3B dugout panarama.jpgAlex snapped a picture of Tim and I as Joe watched BP wrap up:


9 - TJCs at visitors dugout.jpgThen Joe and Alex gave Tim and I advice about which Astro might want to throw us a second ball…
 


10 - dugout ball from strech suba.jpg…and it worked.  Alex and Joe both called out, “Hey, Stech,” to Astros bullpen coach Strech Suba (I think he’s the bullpen coach, at least).  I think Suba threw three balls over.  Tim and I got one.  Joe got one.  And, I think (but am not positive) that Alex got one as well.  A big time assist and thank you to Alex and Joe for that ball.

Tim was looking the other way when Suba threw us the ball.  As I caught it, he turned his head to look toward Suba.  My glove was above his head and I instantly transferred the ball from my glove to my bare hand and from my bare hand to Tim’s glove.  I then erupted with, “Tim, you just caught that ball!”  Joe and Alex followed suit with a lot of enthusiasm.  Tim was fooled, and was happy to have “caught” another ball himself.

All of a sudden Astros pitcher LaTroy Hawkins was standing right by us (and was photographed by Tim):



11 - latroy hawkings.jpgJoe and Alex, along with some other people, went over to see if he was autographing.  But he announced to everyone in the section that he wasn’t signing. He was chatting with his friends who he doesn’t get to see much because (he said) he doesn’t get to NYC much.  He stood there and chatted with some people for a long time.

BP ended and Alex and Joe suggested we head out to the kids’ play area — they were always thinking about what would make the day more fun for Tim.

When we got there, Tim and Alex posed by the fence showing off the auto-repair slums across the street from Citi Field…


12 - queens beautiful queens.jpg…after a few minutes, the ice cream man came driving down the slummish auto-row.  Not suprisingly, there were no little kids chasing him through the auto-slums.

We waited through the line for the whiffle ball field.  Before hitting, Tim cycled through the OF: 


13 - whiffle fielding.jpgTo the left, check out Tim tracking a home run ball.  To the right, Tim is in his athletic stance — ready to get an early jump on the ball.  (Click on the picture to make it larger!)

By the way, the auto-slums are just to the left of the 3B line of the whiffle ball field.

Next, Tim had his chance at bat.  You only get a couple hits before you round the bases.  But Tim loved it: 


14 - whiffle batting.jpgIn the top left, we see Tim taking a hack on the whiffle ball field’s jumbo screen.  Top right, two fielders make an effort for the ball but Tim shots it between them for a liner off of the LF wall.  Then it was time to round the bases.

Tim loved the whiffle ball field.

Next, we parted ways with Alex and Joe.  They went to watch the Astros play catch down the RF line.  Tim and I went into the second deck to look down at the field and the home run apple:


15 - mariner apple.jpgThe apple was in the “up” position during BP and Tim told me that is said “Mariners” on it.  He also thought the little leaf at the top of the apple was great.

Then it was time to grab an ice cream helmet and some seats in section 122 (I still had the ticket Joe gave me — he told me to keep it):


16 - section 122 ice cream helmet.jpgTo the left, you see our view of the plate.  To the right, Alex took a shot of us as Tim scarfed down his chocolate ice cream with sprinkles.  By the way, I just mentioned Alex again.  He and Joe saw us in our seats and came and sat by us in the first inning.

This was our field view:


17 - citi section 122 panarama.jpgNice.

Remember how I said we got $3 tickets because people were disenchanted with the Mets by this point in the season?  Well, check out the empty seats to our left and right:


18 - to left-to right.jpgThere was no one in our row!

I took my only action shots in the first inning.  Miggie Tejada laced this pitch up the middle for a line single to CF:


19a - tejada gets a hit up the middle.jpg. You can’t see the ball yet in the picture below to the left, but Lance “The Big Puma” Berkman blooped that pitch down the RF line for a single.  Tejada advanced to third where we would be stranded:


19b - puma bloops a single.jpgCarlos “El Caballo” Lee then popped up this pitch for an out.


20 - caballo pops out.jpgIn the bottom of the first, the third out was made at first.  The Astros first basemen (who is that, Berkman?), ran over to the dugout and a cluster of kids gathered in the first row to ask for the third out ball.  Alex said, “hold on, I have to run down there.”

As he left our row, Berkman launched the ball over all of the kids.  It was like it was in slow motion.  Alex left us at the perfect time.  It was like he was a wide receiver being led by a deep bomb.  He and the ball converged just as it reached head level.  And then he ran back up showing off the third out ball:


21 - alex gets third out ball.jpg…it was pretty funny.  He was gone from our row (literally) for about 7 seconds.

After the second inning, Tim was getting restless.  I asked him if he wanted to go see the Pepsi Porch in RF (second deck)…where I told him he could see the train passing back-and-forth.  He did.

On the way, we stopped by the Jackie Robinson Rotunda to get pictures with the big 42 (Tim took the picture of me and the 42):


22 - rotunda time.jpgThen we headed up to the Pepsi Porch.  Check out something really cool that I didn’t notice last time we were at Citi Field — a second jumbo screen in the RF foul corner:
 


23 - RF foul jumbo screen.jpg…that’s very cool.  Every stadium has a bunch of seats that can’t see the jumbo screen.  But with this second screen, maybe Citi Field does not have any seats in a jumbo screen blind spot.

Here is a panaramic view from the bridge leading out to the Pepsi Porch:


24 - citi walk to pepsi porch panaramic.jpgTim ran into the porch (he was in a huge running mood at this point) and ran down to the first row in the right CF side of the porch.   I followed him and took this panaramic view:


25 - citi pepsi porch 2 panramic.jpgCheck out what I found just to the right of the view of the jumbo screen/scoreboard…


26 - pepsi porch weeds.jpg…a huge “weed bed.”  Beautiful.

Here is a panaramic view from the foul side of the Pepsi Porch:
27 - citi pepsi porch 3 panaramic.jpgAnd here is a view showing the entire Pepsi Porch from the second deck of the LF foul seats:
 


28 - pepsi porch porch.jpgFrom the spot of that last photo, we turned around and headed up the stairs to the top of the stadium in RF foul territory — another area we’d never visited before at Citi Field.

Here was the view from the top:


29 - citi RF foul upper panaramic.jpgWe continued touring around the upper deck.  I decided to head back to the home plate area of the upper deck.  On the way, I took a panaramic view into the stadium from the back side of the upper deck concourse:


30 - citi rf foul upper concourse panarama.jpgSee all of the glass on the second deck across the stadium — behind the LF foul pole?   That’s a restaurant.  I asked Alex and Joe if they’d ever gone there.   One of their dad’s had been and wasn’t impressed.  There is a deck at the bottom of the restaurant (outside the glass), but apparently they won’t let people out on the deck because they made the railing too short and fear that people will fall into the field level.

Back to the tour.  Here is the view from the upper deck behind home plate:


31 - citi plate upper panaramic.jpgDue to the Sterling Club and suites that close-off the main concourse from the field behind home plate, and the railings and ushers that keep the commoners from getting into the seats behind home plate, this is the best view most people will ever get from behing home plate at Citi Field.

As you approach Citi Field from the subway, you will notice that the upper deck seating behind home plate is set way back from the front of the Jackie Robinson Rotunda entrance.  Well, in the upper deck there is a huge circular concourse area above the Rotunda and behind home plate.  The ground has a huge baseball design built into it, which I thought looked nice.  Along the outside of the concourse (the outer edge of the Rotunda roof), there are food stands, a team store (one of at least 3-4 at Citi Field).  In the middle, there are standing tables where you can stand, eat your food and watch the game on yet another jumbo screen — this one hanging from the back of the upper deck seats:


32 - citi upper deck plate concourse panaramic.jpgI gotta admit, that’s pretty cool.  They have a similar picnic area behind home plate and above the main enterance at Safeco Field, but people up there have no clue what is going on with the game.  Nice touch, Mets.  They have another one of these jumbo screens on the back of the CF scoreboard for the parents standing in the play area with their kids.

Speaking of CF, that was our next stop.  This is the view from the concourse in deep CF:


33 - citi CF 300 level panarama.jpgAnd here is a view that shows where the play area is in relation to the scoreboard and field:


34 - citi scoreboard kids area panarama.jpgWith that, our touring was concluded and Tim wanted to take some hacks in the soft toss cage.  There are two cages.  One for little kids with soft toss or a batting tee (depending on the kid’s choice).  The second has a slow pitching machine.  Here is Tim in the soft toss cage:


35 - soft toss cage.jpgThe lightest bat was really still too heavy for him.  But he had some decent hits.

Right after Tim hit in the cage, the rain started to pour down.  It was the end of the fifth inning (an official game), and the umps called for a rain delay.

Tim and I trudged around in our rain gear until we eventually found ourselves back in the Rotunda.  Tim saw some teenagers climb half-way up the “2″ in Jackie Robinson’s big blue “42.”  Tim wanted to do it too, but (a) it was too high and (b) dad was having none of it.  By this time, it was about 2:30 or 3:00 pm, and Tim was ridiculously tired (no nap) and he lost it when he wasn’t allowed the scale the wet, slippery and tall 42.

As I tried to calm him down a bit, Alex and Joe found us.  They tried their best to cheer him up but he was whiney and crying up a storm.  Then, Alex asked him, “Tim do you want to go upstairs and play catch?”  Instantly, Tim’s crying stopped on a dime.  “Yes!!!,” he responded.  “Ahh, HA!,” I said to Alex and Joe, “you’ve witnessed some of Tim’s classic fake crying!”  One of them asked, “You were faking it, Tim?!”  Tim responded, “well, I was a little sad.”  Classic Tim, the actor!

We had time to kill.  So next, we went and looked at all of the “game used” stuff the Mets had for sale in the field level concourse.

After looking at that stuff for a bit, Alex and Joe asked if we want to go into the Sterling Club.  Now, the Sterling Club is the ultra-exclusive and pricey luxury club level area for all of the people with the big railed-off cushy seats behind home plate.   Alex’s dad had got tickets somehow.  After paying $3 per ticket, how could I pass up an opportunity for Tim and I to see the Sterling Club.

Joe and Alex entered the club.  Safely inside, Alex passed off his ticket to Joe and came and passed it off to me.  Joe then re-entered on his own.  Tim and I strolled around a minute in the Rotunda and then headed up the Sterling Club escalator and into the club.

The lighting in there wasn’t friendly to my camera, all of my pictures came out blurry somehow.  But he is some of what we saw:


36 - sterling stuff.jpgIn the top left, there is a ridiculously fancy looking restaurant, which looked out of place (and was totally empty) at a ballpark.  See the red arrow in top middle of the restaurant?  Its pointing to floor-to-ceiling windows that overlook the visitors’ practice batting cage, which are pictured at the top right.  For perspective, the restaurant is to the left as you enter the Sterling Club and it is located roughly behind the 3B dugout.  As you view them in both of the top pictures, the field is to the left of the restuaurant and the visitors’ batting cage.

At the bottom left, there is a fancy bar (and Joe’s head).  For perspective, the restaurant is behind me as I took that picture and home plate is behind the left side of the bar.

In the bottom right, we are sitting in a little nook in the far opposite side of the Sterling Club next to a bunch of windows overlookign the Mets batting cages (they have two cages, the visitors have only one).  For perspective, the Mets (1B side) dugout is just behind and to the right of me as I took this picture.

At this end of the Sterling Club, there is another fancy bar.  This one is more of a lounge style bar.  The bar is across the back wall (opposite the field) and the rest of the room has scattered seating.

In that picture, we are drinking delicious FREE MILKSHAKES.  It was the best chocolate milk shake I’d had in a long time.

Here is the view from the cushy Sterling Club seating behind home plate:


37 - citi sterling club plate panarama.jpgIt was just misting at this point.  But no one was outside in the seats (except for Alex’s mom).  So we took the oppotunity to play catch in the expensive seats:


38 - sterling catch.jpgThis lasted about 10 minutes before an usher shut us down.

Next, we decided to go check out the old home run apple from Shea Stadium.  It is behind the bullpens in deep, deep, deep right CF.  On our walk out there, it started to rain hard again.  Here is a picture of Tim, Alex and a little girl staying dry under the top hat:


39 - shea apple.jpgAfter spending some time by the bullpens and in the RF concourse (where Tim clanked Cow Bell Man’s cowbell, Tim and Joe ran several races and Alex and Joe swung Tim around by his feet and hands), the rain stopped!

We headed toward the 3B dugout just in time to witness the removal of the tarp:


40 - end of the rain.jpgTim decided to take some pictures in the remaining down time before the game resumed, including this one of Alex and Joe:


41 - joe and alex.jpgAs the grounds crew prepared the field, the P.A. announcer invited the remaining fans to sit wherever they could find open seats in the field level (other than in the Sterling Club).

Tim and I decided to hang out in LF.  Almost everyone else decided to sit in the infield.  As a result, if anyone  was going to hit a homerun to LF, there would be great odds that we would collect our first ever home run ball.  Check out how empty the OF was (heck, check out the whole stadium!): 


42 - where is our homerun ball.jpgTim still had not napped and was still in desparate need of some rest.  But he had no interest.  What he did have interest in for “game part 2″ was “ice cream helmet part 2″:


43 - game part 2-ice cream part 2.jpgUnfortunately, no one hit a homerun for the rest of the game.

In the top of the 9th inning (with the Mets winning), we moved to the infield and sat by the tunnel where we knew the umpires would leave the field after the game.  Here was the excellent view:


44 - ninth inning view.jpgAlthough we’d already got two balls on the day (our first ever in Queens), I wanted to get a ball from the umpire because it would be a commemorative Citi Field inaugural season ball — this would be our last and best opportunity to get one of those balls.  Soon, Alex and Joe both turned up.  They had the same idea.

Tim was ready to catch a foul ball (below to left)… 


45 - one more ball.jpg…while no foul balls came our way, Tim did collect a commemorative ball from home plate umpire Damien Beal (above to right).

“Thanks, Blue!”

After chatting with Alex and Joe a little bit more, we said our good-byes (we’ll be keeping our eye out for those guys next season) and Tim and I headed to the 7-Train platform.

On the way out, I took the following night-time photo of Citi Field:


46 - good night citi field.jpg…that place always looks great in photos.

And that’s the story of our final national league game of the season.  After this game, I have a much better feeling about Citi Field.  I still don’t like the closed-off concourse behind home plate or the design of the standing room areas (no standing counters), but we had a great day in Queens.  The following day, we’d be in Baltimore for the final game of the season. 

Season Fan Stats:

32 Games (plus one 5+ hour rain out with no game)
1 Ken Griffey, Jr. Homerun
(Career Homerun No. 624, August 23, 2009 in Cleveland)

13 Stadiums (Safeco Field, Camden Yards, Citizens Bank Park, Citi Field, Nationals Park, Yankee Stadium, Fenway Park, Wrigley Field, HHH Metrodome, Miller Park, U.S. Cellular, “Jacobs” Field, and Rogers Centre)
25 Teams (Mariners, A’s, Rangers, Rays, Orioles, Tigers, Twins, Indians, Red Sox, Yankees, Royals, White Sox, Blue Jays, Phillies, Mets, Nationals, Cubs, Braves, Padres, Dodgers, Cardinals, Marlins, Pirates, Astros, and Brewers — and sort of the Giants)
27 Ice Cream Helmets (Mariners (5), Phillies (5), Mets, Nationals (3), Red Sox (3), Yankees (2), Twins, Cubs, Brewers, White Sox, Indians, and Blue Jays (and 1 Brewers Cheese Fries Helmet))
35 Baseballs (20 Mariners, 3 Astros, 2 Rangers, 2 Umpire, 1 Phillies, 1 Red Sox, 1 Nationals, 1 Pirates, 1 Twins, 1 Royals, 1 Indians, Yankees/Orioles 1)
MLB Closed Out (NL Closed out on 8/16/09, AL Closed out on 8/17/09) 
6 Autographs (King Felix Hernandez, Ryan Rowland-Smith, Jason Phillips, Ronny Cedeno, Jeremy Guthrie, Ryan Perry) 
5 Player/G.M. Photographs (King Felix Hernandez, Ryan Rowland-Smith, Jason Phillips, Jack Zduriencik, Ryan Perry) 
10 Mascot Pictures (Mariners Moose, Orioles Bird, Slider (Indians), 3 Presidents (Nats), Screech (Nats), 4 Running Sausages (Brewers) – Honorable Mention: The Green Monster statue bench)


47 - balls and mets helmets.jpg

Game 3: Nationals vs. Mets at Citi Field (4/25/2009)

On Sunday, April 25th, Tim and I took to the road at 9am for another baseball adventure:  our first trip to the Mets’ new home, Citi Field.  We live about two hours from Manhattan.  Tim is a huge fan of trains so we drove to the upper west side and parked at 84 & Amsterdam, where my friend, Davlynn, used to live.  From there, we walked over to Central Park West and down three blocks where we caught the A Train at to Times Square where we walked a bit underground and eventually caught the 7 Train to Shea…I mean, Citi Field.

 

Ahh, there is no finer way to see Queens than by elevated coach:

queens.jpg

The view was decidedly better when we arrived at Willets Point and followed the well-marked route toward “Mets Baseball” (all three of these pictures are taken from the subway platform):

citi subway platform.jpg

Without even asking, a nice guy offered to take our photo in front of the new stadium:


TJCs Citi Front.jpg

Next, we headed to an automated kiosk where our online purchased tickets were printed up and spit out at us.  It was time to enter the stadium.  So we headed to the Jackie Robinson Rotunda.

JR Rotunda.jpg

I have mixed thoughts on the Jackie Robinson Rotunda.  It is a nice looking, and quite grand, entrance.  There are interesting photos and nice quotes of Jackie Robinson on the walls.  And, he certainly is a man worth honoring.  It just seems a little odd to me that the Mets made the rotunda such a focal point of their new stadium when Jackie Robinson was neither a Met nor did he play for a team located in Queens.

Anyway, the Rotunda is nice and it gave us the opportunity for Tim to stand in Jackie’s bronzed footprints in the shadow of his retired number:

tjc citi 42.jpg So it was time to check out the field.  Here is our first view of the field:

citi2.jpg

Shea Stadium, like most of the old stadiums, didn’t have a lot of unique features (or, well, at least intentionally unique features).  What it did have, however, was the famous home run apple, which reminds the spectators that they are in the big apple each time a Met player hit a home run (Note: in the 5-7 games I saw at Shea, I do not believe a Met ever hit a home run).   So, I wanted to check out the classic apple and its updated replacement.  The old apple is now resting in a somewhat unceremonious corner of a picnic-ish area behind the bullpen and under the main concourse (pictured below on the right).  The new apple is much larger and is in CF.  Interestingly, they ditched the top hat for the new apple:

Big Apples.jpg

Going to games with Tim, two things are very important to me:  (i) the snacks available at the park and the (ii) quality of the standing room areas.  In these two important areas, I give Citi Field a thumbs up and a thumbs down, respectively.  Check out this picture and then I will explain my thinking:

citi snacks.jpg

I will take them in reverse order.  My thumbs down for the standing room factor is really more a thumbs at a downward 45 degree angle.  Its not terrible.  In fact, there is a lot of standing room available.  However, I rank from the perspective of a father and 3-year-old son watching a game.  At Safeco Field and Citizens Bank Park (and I would assume others), there are standing room areas with counters looping the field.  They are great for Tim to sit on while he eats his ice cream helmet and I watch the game, and because there are no dividers people cram in and lot of people can have front row standing areas (for example, see my pictures from last weekend during the 8th and 9th innings of the Phillies come-from-behind win against the Padres).

 

At Citi Field, instead of counters they just have railings with drink holders spaced about 3 feet apart.  In the picture of Tim with his lollipop above, you can see a drink holder next to the lady-in-red’s hip.  Not kid friendly.  Also, Tim bashed his head on one of the rails while goofing around toward the end of the game.  Now, instead of counters throughout the stadium, some of the standing room area in RF has tall, wobbly green metal tables.  There aren’t many of them and they are set back behind the railing.  So, you are (at least) in the second row of standing room.  Plus, the wobbling is never good when you have a 3-year-old eating chocolate ice cream with sprinkles out of a helmet sitting on top of the structure.  Finally, because of the spacing of the cup holders, only one person stands every three feet and tons of prime front-row-standing room is squandered.  Poor design choice in my somewhat experienced Standing Room Only opinion.  This is all made even worse by the fact that security seeks out any kids sitting on their father’s shoulders (where Tim spends tons of time at every game) and makes the kids get down.  Therefore, at the standing room areas, there is virtually no way (other than on the few tall wobbly tables) for a 3 year old to see the game from most standing room areas.  Again, poor planning.

 

As for the food, prices were pretty much in line with other stadiums, unlike what I have heard about new Yankee Stadium.  I also found it interesting that the menu boards have the price and calories for all food items.  We had Nathan’s Famous hot dogs, which were good.  Tim had his usual ice cream helmet, and a lollipop from a little “Market” that is set back in the RF corner.  With respect to the helmet, the Mets should be commended for providing this classic ball park treat, with sprinkles and hot fudge no less (we passed on the hot fudge).  However, I was disappointed (and at the same time somewhat amused) that the Mets logo on Tim’s helmet was added on top of the “Shea Stadium 1964-2008″ logo.   Obviously, they are using left over helmets from last season with an amateur cosmetic f”ix”:

citi-shea helmet.jpg

I’ll blame this on the Wilpon family losing money in the Madoff ponzi scheme and I’ll forgive them for it.  Again, it was somewhat amusing, so not all bad.

 

A couple more notes about the food picture above.  I understand from Zack Hample’s blog that the skyline above the CF food stands is from the top of the old scoreboard at Shea…I’ve just checked my own picts from last season, by golly, Zack is right (I’m not posting a picture, you’ll have to trust me…or Zack…on this one).

 

Speaking of the old scoreboard, here is the new scoreboard from front and back.  The “front” picture is taken from a bridge in the RCF area.  I’m not sure what the point of the bridge is.  It was crowded with standing room only people the whole game.  One feature that I really liked about the back of the scoreboard is that is had a smaller big screen in it.  So, when your kid(s) are playing back behind the scoreboard (where they have videos, two batting cages and a full whiffle-ball stadium complete with jumbo-tron screen), you can still see the game on the back-of-the-scoreboard screen (in this picture you can see that Omir Santos was batting in the bottom of the first):

citiboard.jpg

As we usually do, we circled all around the inside of the stadium.  Here is a panoramic view from the third-base side:

citi1.jpg

We even decided to head up to our actual seats (for the first time in 3 games this season).  Here is the view from Section 526, Row 9, Seats 14-15, where we sat for one inning and ate our hot dogs:

citi3.jpg

See how the second level juts out straight up from the Mets on-deck circle?  It juts out like that on the 3B side as well.  All of the lower level seats between the “just” are sectioned off with rails.  I imagine that security is tight to get in there.  Plus, those people are the only people who can ever get a view from behind the plate at field level.  The concourse behind home plate is a tunnel set back from the stands.  Its dark and offers no view of the field whatsoever.  This was a terrible idea.  If during the game you want to walk from the 1B side of the stadium to the 3B side on the main level concourse, you’re gonna miss a minute or two of action while you walk the long  closed off concourse to the other side.

 

With the bad, of course, comes the good.  Note that in this picture you can see a large airplane coming in to land at LaGuardia, the airport is really close to the stadium.  At Shea, you could hear 747s flying over head all game long.  At Citi Field, I saw tons of airplanes coming in to land, but I didn’t hear a single one.  I’m not sure why that is.

 

Another plus about the stadium (from our perspective) was that you can see the 7 Train going back-and-forth from the 500 level (probably from below as well).  Tim loved that.  In fact, he is pointing to the 7 Train in the hot dog picture above.  Here is what he was pointing at:

citi porch and 7 train.jpg

While in our assigned seats, I took this picture of Jose Reyes taking a pitch (a strike I believe) – the ball is right next to his front leg in this picture:

Jose Reyes Takes One.jpg

We then went down below and took a couple more pictures of batters while we circled the stadium again.  Here is Omir Santos about to pop this pitch up to 2B (the ball is circled in red):

Omir Santos P4.jpg

Here is former Mariner Jeremy Reed flying out to LF.  He has already hit the ball, which I have again circled in red:

jeremy reed F7.jpg

That concludes my game pictures.  Not that I cared really, but the Mets won 8-2.  Then, the real fun began.  It was kids run the bases day!  After waiting through a HUGE line outside the stadium, we snaked in by the bullpen:

bullpen.jpg

We were led onto the warning track in RF/CF:

TJCs Citi OF grass.jpg

We duplicated our Progressive Field picture from last year down the RF foul line:

TJCs Citi 330 marker.jpg

(Note, extremely low wall, perfect for robbing home runs).  Tim then sprinted toward the infield:


citi RF foul track.jpg

Then he stepped on first and bolted for second:

tjc citi 1B-2B.jpg

tjc citi 2B.jpg

Touching second safely, he made the turn for third and then home.  He then decided he wanted to do it again (not allowed) and he dashed down the first base line and into the infield grass (not allowed) before this lady caught him:

tjc citi IF.jpg

She escorted him to home plate, where he wanted to stay for a while:

tjc Citi Plate.jpg

Eventually, I ran out and grabbed Tim (and touched home myself).  I then snapped this picture of us at the visitors’ dugout:

TJCs Citi Dug.jpg

…and this additional picture showing the unique layout of the dugout.  Then he walked through underbelly of the stadium and headed outside down the leftfield line where I took one last picture of the exterior of the stadium because I wanted to capture this image of Darryl Strawberry in the Mets collage:

 

Citi Visitors Dugout.jpg
citi LF entrance.jpg

And then, another fine day of baseball and another fine stadium under our belts, we began the long, slow process of commuting home…and stopping for Ray’s pizza in Manhattan.

 

Season Fan Stats:

3 Games

3 Stadiums (Camden Yards, Citizens Bank Park, Citi Field)

6 Teams (Orioles, Rays, Phillies, Padres, Mets, Nationals)

2 Ice Cream helmet

0 Baseballs

3 Awesome Days of Baseball

Weekend = Baseball

Stats Last Updated:  May 7, 2009

Well, its the weekend.  So, its time for some baseball.  I’m not talking week-day watch-the-mariners-religiously-on-tv baseball, i’m talking live-in-person baseball.  Unfortunately, once again, its not the Mariners on tap for me and the boy this weekend.  Instead, its the Padres vs. Phils at Citizens Bank Park on Sunday.  We have standing room tickets and plan to explore the entire park, and eat some ice cream in Phils helmets.  It should be good.

Preparing for our second game of the season (and second stadium of the season), I thought i’d do a little tallying of Tim’s baseball stats thus far.  Here we go:

IMG_8052.jpg

Games By Stadium (this season):

  1. Safeco Field – 9 (5) 
  2. Citizens Bank Park -8 (1)
  3. Camden Yards – 4 (1)
  4. PNC Park – 2
  5. Great American Ball Park – 1
  6. Shea Stadium – 1
  7. Progressive Field – 1
  8. Chase Field – 1
  9. (Old) Yankee Stadium – 1
  10. Citi Field – 1 (1)

We currently have tickets for games at Fenway Park (2), Citizens Bank (1), Camden Yards (1), HHH Metrodome (1), Wrigley Field (1), U.S. Cellular  Field (1), Miller Park (1), and Nationals Park (1).  Tomorrow, I will buy tickets to 2 more games at Citizens Bank Park.  I have airplane tickets to Seattle, where I will buy tickets to 5 games at Safeco Field, and we will be back in Seattle for 2-3 games during the final week of the season.  So, Safeco Field will be moving to No. 1 on this list shortly, where it belongs.  (And, in defense of the current rankings, I note that we live 65 miles from Citizens Bank Park and roughly 2,800 miles from Safeco Field).

 Games by Team (this season):

  1. Seattle Mariners – 12 (5)
  2. IMG_8010.jpgPhiladelphia Phillies – 9 (1)
  3. Baltimore Orioles - 4 (1)
  4. New York Mets – 4 (1)
  5. Oakland Athletics - 3 (3)
  6. Cincinnati Reds – 3
  7. Texas Rangers – 2 (2)
  8. Minnesota Twins – 2
  9. Cleveland Indians – 2
  10. Pittsburgh Pirates – 2
  11. St. Louis Cardinals – 2
  12. Chicago Cubs – 1
  13. Chicago White Sox – 1
  14. Anaheim Angels of Anaheim - 1
  15. Tampa Bay Rays – 1 (1)
  16. gotball.jpgToronto Blue Jays – 1
  17. San Francisco Giants – 1
  18. Arizona Diamondbacks – 1
  19. Florida Marlins – 1
  20. Colorado Rockies – 1
  21. Washington Nationals – 2 (1)
  22. New York Yankees - 1
  23. San Diego Padres – 1 (1)

Tim has also seen the Brewers, Giants, Rockies and Blue Jays in Spring Training games, but I don’t count them.

We currently have tickets to see the Phils and Padres tomorrow, the Mariners (3), Red Sox (2), Yankees (1), Mets (1), Nationals (2), Pirates (1), Cubs (1), Astros (1), Orioles (1), Tigers (1), Brewers (1), Royals (1), White Sox (1), Twins (1), and Indians (1).  Tomorrow, I will buy tickets to see the Phils play the Dodgers (1) and Braves (1).  And, as mentioned, in May we will see 5 games in Seattle between the Mariners and Athletics (3) and Rangers (2).  So, like Safeco Field, the Mariners will be moving to No. 1 on this list shortly, where they belong.

I will update this entry as we check off new teams and new stadiums.  Stay tuned.

PS – While writing this blog, the Indians scored 14 runs against the Yankees in the second inning.  HAHAHA…Excellent!

PPS – Here is a shot of the first pitch of Tim’s first MLB game.  It is Gil Meche delivering a strike to Frank Catalanotto (Blue Jays) on September 12, 2006:

Tim's First MLB Pitch.jpg

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